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I want to execute the code in the try block again after an exception is caught. Is that possible somehow?

For Eg:

try
{
    //execute some code
}
catch(Exception e)
{
}

If the exception is caught I want to go in the try block again to "execute some code" and try again to execute it.

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no, not a built-in standard way, but you can build your own –  John Pick Feb 14 '12 at 5:11
    
Under what circumstances would you like to use this?? Accepting user input?? –  Sunil Kumar B M Feb 14 '12 at 5:11
    
Have you tried putting it inside a while loop? –  NYC Canuck Feb 14 '12 at 5:12
    
1  
Also known as: Hey, how can I use On Error Resume Next in C#? –  Cody Gray Feb 14 '12 at 5:18
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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Put it in a loop. Possibly a while loop around a boolean flag to control when you finally want to exit.

bool tryAgain = true;
while(tryAgain){
  try{
    // execute some code;
    // Maybe set tryAgain = false;
  }catch(Exception e){
    // Or maybe set tryAgain = false; here, depending upon the exception, or saved details from within the try.
  }
}

Just be careful to avoid an infinite loop.

A better approach may be to put your "some code" within its own method, then you could call the method from both within the try and the catch as appropriate.

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If you wrap your block in a method, you can recursively call it

void MyMethod(type arg1, type arg2, int retryNumber = 0)
{
    try
    {
        ...
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        if (retryNumber < maxRetryNumber)
            MyMethod(arg1, arg2, retryNumber+1)
        else
            throw;
    }
}

or you could do it in a loop.

int retries = 0;

while(true)
{
    try
    {
        ...
        break; // exit the loop if code completes
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        if (retries < maxRetries)
            retries++;
        else
            throw;
    }
}
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And then you can also run into stackoverflow due to no endpoint. –  Mickey Perlstein Apr 16 '12 at 9:51
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This should work:

count = 0;
while (!done) {
  try{
    //execute some code;
    done = true;
  }
  catch(Exception e){
  // code
  count++;
  if (count > 1) { done = true; }
  }
}
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why use flags, you are running a for loop here. so use a for loop structure. –  Mickey Perlstein Apr 16 '12 at 9:52
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There is another way to do it (though as others have mentioned, not really recommended). Here's an example using a file download retry to more closely match the retry keyword found in Ruby in VB6.

RetryLabel:

try
{
    downloadMgr.DownLoadFile("file:///server/file", "c:\\file");
    Console.WriteLine("File successfully downloaded");
}
catch (NetworkException ex)
{
    if (ex.OkToRetry)
        goto RetryLabel;
}
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using label is not a good coding practice –  Sunil Kumar B M Feb 14 '12 at 5:20
2  
Seems a lot more clear than recursion or infinite loops to solve this particular problem. –  Bill Feb 14 '12 at 5:36
    
Unfortunately, that's exactly what you potentially accomplished here - an infinite loop. If the exception occurs, and nothing is done to resolve the underlying cause, there is no retry counter or such to stop the loop. The ex.OkToRetry check might be a start to this, but it isn't clear as to if or where this would ever be set differently between true and false. –  ziesemer May 20 '13 at 20:45
    
@ziesemer - the same could be said for your example which got accepted as the answer. –  user1021726 Feb 25 at 12:16
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