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These lines of code of mine produced same error

   Enum ConnectionState
       INTERNET_CONNECTION_MODEM = 0x1
       INTERNET_CONNECTION_LAN = 0x2
       INTERNET_CONNECTION_PROXY = 0x4
       INTERNET_RAS_INSTALLED = 0x10
       INTERNET_CONNECTION_OFFLINE = 0x20
       INTERNET_CONNECTION_CONFIGURED = 0x40
    End Enum

It says:

End of statement expected

I tried to do Google search and it appears that I follow a correct format. For example these lines below are valid.

Public Enum InterfaceColors
    MistyRose = &HE1E4FF&
    SlateGray = &H908070&
    DodgerBlue = &HFF901E&
    DeepSkyBlue = &HFFBF00&
    SpringGreen = &H7FFF00&
    ForestGreen = &H228B22&
    Goldenrod = &H20A5DA&
    Firebrick = &H2222B2&
End Enum

These are working too

Enum SecurityLevel
    IllegalEntry = -1
    MinimumSecurity = 0
    MaximumSecurity = 1
End Enum

Both were taken from MSDN.

Can someone advise me what was wrong with my lines?

Thank's in advance.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

VB doesn't understand 0x notation. VB uses &H instead.

Enum ConnectionState 
    INTERNET_CONNECTION_MODEM = &H1 
    INTERNET_CONNECTION_LAN = &H2 
    INTERNET_CONNECTION_PROXY = &H4 
    INTERNET_RAS_INSTALLED = &H10 
    INTERNET_CONNECTION_OFFLINE = &H20 
    INTERNET_CONNECTION_CONFIGURED = &H40 
End Enum 
share|improve this answer

Can someone advise me what was wrong with my lines?

You've not declared the hexadecimal literals correctly.

You've written them the way you would in C# (with a 0x prefix), but VB.NET expects them to be written with a &H prefix, just like your sample code shows.

Indeed, the error message could probably be more helpful, but what it's trying to tell you is that it doesn't recognize the 0x sequence and instead expected to find the end of the line of code.

Change your enum to look like this:

Enum ConnectionState
   INTERNET_CONNECTION_MODEM = &H1
   INTERNET_CONNECTION_LAN = &H2
   INTERNET_CONNECTION_PROXY = &H4
   INTERNET_RAS_INSTALLED = &H10
   INTERNET_CONNECTION_OFFLINE = &H20
   INTERNET_CONNECTION_CONFIGURED = &H40
End Enum

The sample code shown in the question also suffixes each of the literals with the & character. That's a holdover from the days of BASIC gone by; it tells the compiler that the literal represents a Long type. You probably pulled that sample enum declaration from some old VB 6 code, but there's little risk of your values overflowing given the expanded range of the Integer type in VB.NET.

share|improve this answer
    
Wasn't the & appended to variablenames to declare them as Long? Or appended an L to the value to tell the compiler that the value should be treated as a Long? Ref: Type Characters (Visual Basic) – Nicholas Feb 14 '12 at 12:17
    
@Nicholas: Yes. But what I said is still accurate; from the article you linked: "Literals can also use the identifier type characters (%, &, @, !, #, $)" For whatever reason, when declaring enumerated constants, particularly those from the Win32 API, the & suffix was ubiquitous to indicate that a literal value should be interpreted as a Long. – Cody Gray Feb 14 '12 at 20:46

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