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Im just asking you a simple question to you experts because i just started studying android basics.

I tried to create a table view and display some strings in it.

i write the xml like this but im getting some warnings "I18N] Hardcoded string "Open...", should use @string resource" when a string is declared.

<TableRow>
    <TextView
        android:layout_column="1"
        android:text="hello"
        android:padding="3dip" />
    <TextView
        android:text="helloo"
        android:gravity="right"
        android:padding="3dip" />
</TableRow>

<TableRow>
    <TextView
        android:layout_column="1"
        android:text="how"
        android:padding="3dip" />
    <TextView
        android:text="Ctrl-Shift-S"
        android:gravity="right"
        android:padding="3dip" />
</TableRow>

<View
    android:layout_height="2dip"
    android:background="#FF909090" />

<TableRow>
    <TextView
        android:text="are"
        android:padding="3dip" />
    <TextView
        android:text="you"
        android:padding="3dip" />
</TableRow>

Can you please help me please.Thanks in advance.

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Strings should go to the res/values/strings.xml file which could look like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <string name="hello">Hello World!</string>
    <string name="app_name">My App</string>
    <string name="ctrl-shift-s">Ctrl-Shift-S</string>
</resources>

Applications can be localized easily: In Eclipse, right-click the res folder, select Android XML Values File, click next. Enter strings.xml, click next. Now you can add various options like language or network code.

Android resource localization

Now you can reference your strings using @string/ctrl-shift-s.

<TableRow>
    <TextView
        android:layout_column="1"
        android:text="how"
        android:padding="3dip" />
    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textview-command"
        android:text="@string/ctrl-shift-s"
        android:gravity="right"
        android:padding="3dip" />
</TableRow>

Or, within Java code, R.string.ctrl-shift-s.

The @+id/xyz creates an ID so you can get the view from code.

All resources are being added to the R class automatically.

TextView textView = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textview-command);
if (textView != null)
    textView.setText(R.string.ctrl-shift-s);
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when i give the resource it is showing the warning Attribute is missing the Android namespace prefix. –  suji Feb 14 '12 at 6:38
    
I guess your layout file is missing the xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" attribute for the root element. –  David Czihak Feb 14 '12 at 6:43
    
now i give my xml like <TextView android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:text="@string/hello" /> <TableRow> <TextView android:layout_column="2" android:text="@string/haiii" android:padding="3dip" /> <TextView android:text="@string/hellooo" android:gravity="right" android:padding="3dip" /> </TableRow> –  suji Feb 14 '12 at 6:51
    
and in string.xml <string name="haiii">Hello World, TableviewActivity!</string> <string name="hellooo">Tableview</string> –  suji Feb 14 '12 at 6:52
    
How can i solve this issue –  suji Feb 14 '12 at 6:53
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Yes Declare the static string values in @String resources and provide its reference from the layout xml file.

<resources>
    <string name="hello">Hello World, HomeActivity!</string>
</resources>
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'I18N' is shorthand for internationalization; as in, not everyone in the world speaks or reads English. The warning about 'should use @string resource' is just a reminder that locale-specific information should be placed in 'resource bundles' (eg /res/values/strings.xml) so that labels and other text can be provided in different languages without having to re-code and recompile the entire application for each language.

If you're just testing things out, you can safely ignore that warning, but it's a good idea to get in the habit of referencing strings as resources in external files rather than hardcoding them directly in the application itself.

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just create a new .xml file named strings in your resources value folder. write your all strings in that strings.xml file and then assign strings from this file. @strings/any-string

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <string name="Your-String1">yourstring1</string>
    <string name="Your-String2">yourstring2</string>
</resources
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