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This question already has an answer here:

I have to following code in VS2008 .net 3.5 using WinForms:

byte percent = 70;
byte zero = 0;

Bitmap copy = (Bitmap)image1.Clone();
...

Color oColor = copy.GetPixel(x, y);
byte oR = (byte)(oColor.R - percent < zero ? zero : oColor.R - percent);

When I leave the "(byte)" off the last line of code, I get a compiler error saying it "Cannot implicitly convert type 'int' to 'byte'." If everything is of type byte and byte is an integer type... then why do I need to have the cast?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, George Duckett, jszumski, PSL, soon Jun 2 '13 at 6:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6  
Eric Lippert says, "I don't think of bytes as "numbers"; I think of them as patterns of bits that could be interpreted as numbers, or characters, or colors or whatever. If you're going to be doing math on them and treating them as numbers, then it makes sense to move the result into a data type that is more commonly interpreted as a number." See stackoverflow.com/questions/941584/byte-byte-int-why-c . – Brian Jun 3 '09 at 13:26
3  
You guys do realize you've marked this as a duplicate even though it was asked before the "already has an answer here" link? – Charlie Martin Nov 26 '13 at 22:13
    
Hell, now it even says "asked before" even though the other question was asked three years later. – Charlie Martin Sep 18 '15 at 19:52
    
Uh, actually, every data value is a bit pattern that can be interpreted as a number. – Charlie Martin Sep 18 '15 at 19:54
up vote 15 down vote accepted

Because subtraction is coercing up to an integer. As I recall, byte is an unsigned type in C#, so subtraction can take you out of the domain of bytes.

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Subtraction can take you out of the domain of every number type. That doesn't really explain why there is no byte-specific subtraction operator. – John Gietzen Sep 18 '15 at 17:02
    
Well, then, the answer is "because the developers of C# decided they didn't want one." – Charlie Martin Sep 18 '15 at 19:50

That's because the result of a byte subtraction doesn't fit in a byte:

byte - byte = (0..255) - (0..255) = -255..255
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1  
What a nice graphic explanation !!! – Jhonny D. Cano -Leftware- May 29 '09 at 18:23
14  
Neither does any integer type except floats or decimals. int is of finite range too, so (min_int - max_int) wont fit, but it returns an int. – Adam Frisby May 29 '09 at 18:24
2  
@Adam: 1) floats and decimals are not integer types. 2) Results of subtractions for these also may not fit, as these also have a finite (though large) range. – Brian Jun 3 '09 at 13:24

Arithmetic on bytes results in an int value by default.

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Because arithmetic on bytes returns integers by default so of the two possible assignments the narrower type of zero (byte) is promoted to int (that of oColor.r - percent). Thus the type of the operation is an int. The compiler will not, without a cast, allow you to assign a wider type to a narrower type, because it's a lossy operation. Hence you get the error, unless you explicitly say "I know I'm losing some data, it's fine" with the cast.

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This is because byte subtraction returns an int. Actually any binary arithmetic operations on bytes will return an int, so the cast is required.

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I think that's subtraction, actually.... – Charlie Martin May 29 '09 at 18:20
    
Oops - thanks Charlie, I corrected it. – Andrew Hare May 29 '09 at 18:20
    
Is there a reason for the downvote? – Andrew Hare May 29 '09 at 18:26
    
Wasn't me, at least. I think we're having a random downvoter, I got one too. – Charlie Martin May 29 '09 at 18:29

Because arithmetic operations on sbyte, byte, ushort, and short are automatically converted to int. The most plausible reason for this is that such operations are likely to overflow or underflow.

Thus, in your ternary operation, the final oColor.R - percent, actually results in an int, not a byte. So the return type of the operation is int.

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Because the arithmetic expression on the right-hand side of the assignment operator evaluates to int by default. In your example percent defaults to int. You can read more about it on the MSDN page.

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Try to run this C# code: object o = (byte)(1); o = (int)o; What do you expect? Now try :)

I think this is right:

Eric Lippert says, "I don't think of bytes as "numbers"; I think of them as patterns of bits that could be interpreted as numbers, or characters, or colors or whatever. If you're going to be doing math on them and treating them as numbers, then it makes sense to move the result into a data type that is more commonly interpreted as a number."

Perhaps byte is closer to char than to int.

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FWIW, java also promotes bytes to int.

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