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I am new to Perl, and can't find the answer to the question in the Learning Perl book.

For example I have a array like:

my @loop=("op1_sel","op2_sel");

and two hash table as:

my %op1_sel=(
       "bibuf","000",
       "self","101"
            );
my %op2_sel=(
        "zero","1",
        "temp","0"
            );

Now I want to use variables in the loop to loop for the hash table for a particular key for example:

foreach(@loop)
{
     print  ${$_}{"bibuf"} ;
}

But it seems not working, I know the ${$_} part is wrong, can anyone can tell me how to fix this ?

share|improve this question
2  
Don't do that. Either put references to the hashes into an array and loop over that, or (if the names are important) put them in a hash and use the values in the array as key names (or just loop over the outer hash if the order isn't important). –  Quentin Feb 14 '12 at 9:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't refer to lexical (my) variables using the ${$foo} syntax. You could probably make it work if they were package variables, but this would not be the right way to go about it.

The right way to do it is using a nested data structure.

I can see two obvious ways of doing it. You could either make an array of op_sel containing the inner hashes directly, or create a hash of hashes, and then index into that.

So "array of hashes":

my @op_sels = (
    {
        bibuf => '000',
        self  => '101',
    },
    {
        zero => '1',
        temp => '0',
    },
);

for my $op (@op_sels) {
    print $$op{bibuf};
}

and "hash of hashes":

my %op_sels = (
    1 => {
       bibuf => '000',
       self  => '101',
    },
    2 => {
        zero => '1',
        temp => '0',
    },
);

for my $op_key (sort keys %op_sels) {
    print $op_sels{$op_key}{bibuf};
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks very much for you answer with so much detail,the "array of hash" really helped me .i put the reference of hashes in an array ,again thanks very much for your help –  aspirinnnnn Feb 15 '12 at 1:50

Use nested hashes. Like this:

my %op;
# put a hash reference into hash, twice
$op{op1_sel} = \%op1_sel; 
$op{op2_sel} = \%op2_sel;

# later ...
foreach (keys %op) {
    print "bibuf of $_: $op{$_}->{bibuf}\n";
};

Or, long story short, just

my %op = (
    op1_sel => { 
        foo => 1,
        bar => 2,
        # ...
    },
    op2_sel => {
        # ...
    },
};

The {} construct creates a reference to anonymous hash and is the standard way of handling nested data structures.

See also perldoc perldsc.

share|improve this answer

You can use eval for this.

foreach(@loop)
{
      eval "\%var = \%$_";
      print $var{"bibuf"} ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
this worked ,but why ? can you explain it to me ,thanks very much –  aspirinnnnn Feb 14 '12 at 9:06
    
The string in the quotes expands like %var = %op1_sel or %var = %op2_sel in the iterations of the cycle. eval executes it as perl script so %var is populated with the hash. Then you can use the new variable. –  core1024 Feb 14 '12 at 9:10
12  
This might answer the question correctly but I recommend not actually using code like this. Using eval and especially referencing variables by their name in another variable is to be generally discouraged (despite very special cases where it might be appropriate). Aspirinnnnn: I hope you've learned a bit but when you have an actual problem similar to this please stick to Perl references. –  Daniel Böhmer Feb 14 '12 at 9:10
    
@aspirinnnnn: What halo said –  hochgurgler Feb 14 '12 at 10:59

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