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I have created an immutable Queue in F# as follows:

type Queue<'a>(f : 'a list, r : 'a list) =    
    let check = function
        | [], r -> Queue(List.rev r, [])
        | f, r -> Queue(f, r)

    member this.hd =
        match f with
        | [] -> failwith "empty"
        | hd :: tl -> hd

    member this.tl =
        match f, r with
        | [], _ -> failwith "empty"
        | hd::f, r -> check(f, r)

    member this.add(x) = check(f, x::r)

    static member empty : Queue<'a> = Queue([], [])

I want to create an instance of an empty Queue, however I get a value-restriction exception:

> let test = Queue.empty;;

  let test = Queue.empty;;
  ----^^^^

C:\Documents and Settings\juliet\Local Settings\Temp\stdin(5,5): error FS0030: Value restriction. The value 'test' has been inferred to have generic type val test : Queue<'_a> Either define 'test' as a simple data term, make it a function with explicit arguments or, if you do not intend for it to be generic, add a type annotation.

Basically, I want the same kind of functionality seen in the Set module which allows me to write:

> let test = Set.empty;;

val test : Set<'a>

How can I modify my Queue class to allow users to create empty queues?

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2  
pojh This should be a CW :) –  Ólafur Waage May 29 '09 at 18:26
2  
Downvoters: please provide a reason why you've downvoted this question. –  Juliet May 29 '09 at 18:31
    
@Princess: Downvoting is anonymous. Why you need to know who did it? –  GEOCHET May 29 '09 at 18:31
    
I gave +1 after attempting to fix the title up some. –  TheTXI May 29 '09 at 18:32
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to use GeneralizableValueAttribute, a la:

type Queue<'a>(f : 'a list, r : 'a list) =  // '
    let check = function
        | [], r -> Queue(List.rev r, [])
        | f, r -> Queue(f, r)

    member this.hd =
        match f with
        | [] -> failwith "empty"
        | hd :: tl -> hd

    member this.tl =
        match f, r with
        | [], _ -> failwith "empty"
        | hd::f, r -> check(f, r)

    member this.add(x) = check(f, x::r)
module Queue =    
    [<GeneralizableValue>]
    let empty<'T> : Queue<'T> = Queue<'T>([], []) // '

let test = Queue.empty
let x = test.add(1)       // x is Queue<int>
let y = test.add("two")   // y is Queue<string>

You can read a little more about it in the language spec.

share|improve this answer
    
I could have sworn that I'd written exactly that, but it looks like you've written it better. Much appreciated :) –  Juliet May 29 '09 at 22:41
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