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My goal is to echo the argument passed to a function. For example, how can this be done?

$contact_name = 'foo';

function do_something($some_argument){
// echo 'contact_name'  .... How???
}

do_something($contact_name);
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As a PHP developer I must ask, why would you need this? The only valid reason for wanting this is in the context of debugging/error handling/etc.. –  Evert May 29 '09 at 22:01

9 Answers 9

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't. If you want to do that, you need to pass the names as well, e.g:

$contact_name = 'foo';
$contact_phone = '555-1234';

function do_something($args = array()) {
    foreach ($args as $name => $value) {
        echo "$name: $value<br />";
    }
}

do_something(compact('contact_name', 'contact_phone'));
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Nice, never used compact before. –  Adam Backstrom May 29 '09 at 20:15
    
I never used it either until I started creating CakePHP websites. They use it quite a bit and I saw how it can make certain functions statements much shorter. –  Sander Marechal May 29 '09 at 20:18
    
Thanks Sander. Works great! –  edt Jun 1 '09 at 19:06

Straight off the PHP.net variables page:

<?php
  function vname(&$var, $scope=false, $prefix='unique', $suffix='value')
  {
    if($scope) $vals = $scope;
    else $vals = $GLOBALS;
    $old = $var;
    $var = $new = $prefix.rand().$suffix;
    $vname = FALSE;
    foreach($vals as $key => $val) {
      if($val === $new) $vname = $key;
    }
    $var = $old;
    return $vname;
  }
?>
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I just tested this and it actually works, amazing. now to find a real-world use for it ;) –  Kris May 29 '09 at 19:27

To track Variable name You can throw and catch Exception. In penultimate line of trace is information about this function name and name of variables.

Example how use this: http://blog.heintze.pl/2012/01/12/lepszy-var_dump-czyli-przyjemniejsze-debugowanie-php/ to create better var dump (Link to code: http://blog.heintze.pl/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/bigWeb.zip )

Unfortunately - this article is only in polish at this time.

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Variables are just means to address values or areas in the memory. You cannot get the variable name that’s value has been passed to a function.

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Disclaimer: this will oonly work if you pass a variable to the function, not a value, and it only works when your not in a function or a class. So only the GLOBAL scope works :)

Good funct($var)
Bad funct(1)

You can do it actually contrary to popular believe ^_^. but it involves a few lookup tricks with the $GLOBALS variable.

you do it like so:

$variable_name = "some value, better if its unique";

function funct($var) {
   foreach ($GLOBALS as $name => $value) {
      if ($value == $var) {
         echo $name; // will echo variable_name
         break;
      }
   }
}

this method is not fool proof tho. Because if two variables have the same value, the function will get the name of the first one it finds. Not the one you want :P Its best to make the variable value unique before hand if you want accuracy on variable names

Another method would be to use reference to be accurate like so

$variable_name = 123;

function funct(&$var) {

   $old = $var;
   $var = $checksum = md5(time());  // give it unique value

   foreach ($GLOBALS as $name => $value) {
      if ($value == $var) {
         echo $name; // will echo variable_name
         $var = $old; // reassign old value
         break;
      }
   }
}

so it is entirely possible :)

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that's not even going to work if i pass (int)1 in there (will return 'argc' –  Kris May 29 '09 at 18:55
    
well the examples assume you pass a variable and not a value. thanks for reminding me tho, ill update with a disclamer :) –  Ozzy May 29 '09 at 18:58
1  
@ozzy, i passed it in as a variable with that value, even by reference it doesn't give me anythin near the requisted 'contact_name' (yes i am actually trying to solve this) –  Kris May 29 '09 at 19:02
    
now im intrigued >< i wrote that code from memory, ima run it now see if it works –  Ozzy May 29 '09 at 19:06
    
Strange, i tested both and both work perfectly. on the reference one, i use funct($var) not funct(&$var), mite be a reason it dont work for you. The both work fine for me tho. You sure your testing in the correct scope? –  Ozzy May 29 '09 at 19:09

Based on PTBNL's (most definately correct) answer i came up with a more readable (at least i think so) approach:

/**
 * returns the name of the variable posted as the first parameter.
 * If not called from global scope, pass in get_defined_vars() as the second parameter
 *
 * behind the scenes:
 *
 *   this function only works because we are passing the first argument by reference.
 *   1. we store the old value in a known variable
 *   2. we overwrite the argument with a known randomized hash value
 *   3. we loop through the scope's symbol table until we find the known value
 *   4. we restore the arguments original value and
 *   5. we return the name of the symbol we found in the table
 */
function variable_name( & $var, array $scope = null )
{
    if ( $scope == null )
    {
    	$scope = $GLOBALS;
    }

    $__variable_name_original_value = $var;
    $__variable_name_temporary_value = md5( number_format( microtime( true ), 10, '', '' ).rand() );
    $var = $__variable_name_temporary_value;

    foreach( $scope as $variable => $value )
    {
    	if ( $value == $__variable_name_temporary_value && $variable != '__variable_name_original_value' )
    	{
    		$var = $__variable_name_original_value;
    		return $variable;
    	}
    }
    return null;
}

// prove that it works:

$test = 1;
$hello = 1;
$world = 2;
$foo = 100;
$bar = 10;
$awesome = 1;

function test_from_local_scope()
{
    $local_test = 1;
    $local_hello = 1;
    $local_world = 2;
    $local_foo = 100;
    $local_bar = 10;
    $local_awesome = 1;

    return variable_name( $local_awesome, get_defined_vars() );
}
printf( "%s\n", variable_name( $awesome, get_defined_vars() ) ); // will echo 'awesome'
printf( "%s\n", test_from_local_scope() ); // will also echo awesome;
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Sander has the right answer, but here is the exact thing I was looking for:

$contact_name = 'foo';

function do_something($args = array(), $another_arg) {
    foreach ($args as $name => $value) {
        echo $name;
        echo '<br>'.$another_arg;
    }
}

do_something(compact(contact_name),'bar');
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Not possible.

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Downvoter: Sorry you don't like it, but it's not. The accepted answer and all the others are cutesy ways to pretend that you're doing what OP asked for, not ways to actually do it. My answer and Gumbo's are the only accurate ones. –  chaos Jan 13 '12 at 20:50
class Someone{
  protected $name='';
  public function __construct($name){
    $this->name=$name;
  }

  public function doSomthing($arg){
     echo "My name is: {$this->name} and I do {$arg}";
  }
}

//in main
$Me=new Someone('Itay Moav');
$Me->doSomething('test');
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1  
somehow i wonder how this is related to the question... –  Kris May 29 '09 at 18:57

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