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How can I determine whether a given node is present in my input xml?

If the node is present I would like to use the value of reportAuthor1, but otherwise I would use the value of reportAuthor. I have tried unsuccessfully to use if and else.

 <xsl:choose>
 <xsl:when test="reportAuthor1=''">
 <xsl:value-of select="reportAuthor"/>
 </xsl:when>
 <xsl:otherwise>
 <xsl:value-of select="reportAuthor1"/>
 </xsl:otherwise>
 </xsl:choose>
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use not() to check whether a node doesn't exist at all:

<xsl:choose>  
  <xsl:when test="not(reportAuthor1)">  
    <xsl:value-of select="reportAuthor"/>
  </xsl:when>  
  <xsl:otherwise>  
    <xsl:value-of select="reportAuthor1"/>  
  </xsl:otherwise>  
</xsl:choose> 
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Thanks this works for me. –  udaya726 Feb 14 '12 at 11:57

This is probably the simplest and shortest, one-line XPath expression. Use:

<xsl:value-of select="reportAuthor1 | reportAuthor[not(reportAuthor1)]"/>
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In this specific case, you may also write

<xsl:value-of select="reportAuthor1 | reportAuthor"/>

| returns the union of sets returned by the XPath queries from the left and from the right side of this operator, and <xsl:value-of select="somequery"/> will send to the output the value of the first node in the set returned by somequery. Thus, if both reportAuthor1 and reportAuthor are set, it'll output the value of reportAuthor1; if only reportAuthor is set, it'll output the value of reportOutput.

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Thanks for the quick reply.I have tried the previous solution .Il try this also. –  udaya726 Feb 14 '12 at 11:57
    
Aaah, my comment got screwed up by parser originally, one must not forget the blank line! My code example is similar to Dimitre Novatchev answer, despite being slower (reportAuthor will be calculated even if there is a reportAuthor1). From the other side, XSLT processor should be smart enough not to calculate reportAuthor in such a situation. –  penartur Feb 14 '12 at 13:25
3  
One issue with using the union operator rather than <xsl:choose> is that it selects whichever comes first in the XML, so if a reportAuthor element preceded a reportAuthor1, it would use that, even though reportAuthor1 is first in the select clause. You can mitigate this with reportAuthor1 | reportAuthor[not(../reportAuthor1)], which will only select a reportAuthor element if it doesn't have a reportAuthor1 sibling (the xpath specifies that it's parent doesn't have a reportAuthor1 child). –  Flynn1179 Feb 14 '12 at 13:40
    
@Flynn1179 You're absolutely right. I didn't know of this not so obvious feature of unions. This makes my answer incorrect, and Dimitre Novatchev's answer the only correct one with the union operator. –  penartur Feb 15 '12 at 4:12
2  
Actually, Dimitre's is wrong, it would select reportAuthor elements that don't have a reportAuthor1 CHILD. The ../ in my suggested fix is important. –  Flynn1179 Feb 15 '12 at 7:58

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