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I have two strings like this

/home/user/Desktop/aaaa/Final/
/home/user/Desktop/aaaa/folder3333/IMAG0486.jpg

and my result string should be something like this

/home/user/Desktop/aaaa/Final/folder3333/IMAG0486.jpg

meaning when I find the longest match in this case

"/home/user/Desktop/aaaa"

then I add the rest of the second string

"folder3333/IMAG0486.jpg"

to the fist string

and the result string is

/home/user/Desktop/aaaa/Final/folder3333/IMAG0486.jpg
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Split the paths on / to arrays. Iterate over the arrays until you find the difference, add the rest of the second array to the output. I left the debugging prints in the code, by removing them it can be shortened significantly.

#! /bin/bash
s1=/home/user/Desktop/aaaa/Final/
s2=/home/user/Desktop/aaaa/folder3333/IMAG0486.jpg
expect=/home/user/Desktop/aaaa/Final/folder3333/IMAG0486.jpg
out=$s1

_IFS=$IFS
IFS=/
parts1=($s1)
parts2=($s2)
IFS=$_IFS

matching=1
for ((i=0;i<${#parts2[@]};i++)) ; do
    if [[ $matching && ${parts1[i]} == ${parts2[i]} ]] ; then
        echo same ${parts2[i]}
    else
        echo different ${parts1[i]} ${parts2[i]}
        matching=0
        out+=${parts2[i]}/
    fi
done
out=${out%/}

echo $expect
echo $out
share|improve this answer

This works for me and has working unit tests:

path_common()
{
    if [ -z "${2-}" ]
    then
        return 2
    fi

    # Remove repeated slashes
    for param
    do
        param=$(printf %s. "$1" | tr -s "/")
        set -- "$@" "${param%.}"
        shift
    done

    common_path=$1
    shift

    for param
    do
        while case ${param%/}/ in "${common_path%/}/"*) false;; esac; do
            new_common_path=${common_path%/*}
            if [ "$new_common_path" = "$common_path" ]
            then
                return 1 # Dead end
            fi
            common_path=$new_common_path
        done
    done
    printf %s "$common_path"
}
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Less reliable than other solutions, but works fine for regular cases:

#!/bin/bash

p1="/home/user/Desktop/aaaa/Final/"
p2="/home/user/Desktop/aaaa/folder3333/IMAG0486.jpg"

printf "%s|%s" "$p1" "$p2" | sed -e 's_^\(\(.*\)\/.*\)|\2/\(.*\)$_\1\3_'
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