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This might sound like a stupid problem but I wondered for a long time is there a better way that this:

struct X
{
    int a;
    int b;
};
bool sortComp(const X first, const X second)
{
    if (first.a!=second.a)
        return (first.a<second.a);
    else
        return (first.b<second.b);

}
class setComp
{
public:
    bool operator() (const X first, const X second) const
    {
        if (first.a!=second.a)
                return (first.a<second.a);
            else
                return (first.b<second.b);
    }
};
int main()
{
    vector<X> v;
    set<X, setComp> s;
    sort(begin(v), end(v),sortComp);
}

As you see I implement the same functionality twice, once for sorting, and once for implicit sorting in the set. Is there a way to avoid code duplication?

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1  
bool operator() (const X first, const X second) const {return sortComp(first, second);} ? –  Vladimir Feb 14 '12 at 11:15
1  
In this particular case, I would implement operator< for struct X, so you can forget about it for the set and the sort. –  stefaanv Feb 14 '12 at 11:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Sure, just choose one of both and change the call of the other.

// choosing the function object
sort(begin(v), end(v), setComp()); // create setComp, sort will call operator()

// choosing the function
set<X, bool(*)(const X, const X)> s(sortComp); // pass function pointer

I personally would recommend the functor version.

share|improve this answer
    
ahhhh, the () after setComp... Im such a noob. function cast :( Im not a big fan :) But function object works great –  NoSenseEtAl Feb 14 '12 at 11:18
    
I don't see any function cast, which one do you mean? –  fredoverflow Feb 14 '12 at 11:24
    
my knowledge of phrases is probably bad... I meant bool(*)(const X, const X) –  NoSenseEtAl Feb 14 '12 at 11:25
    
@NoSenseEtAl: For the record, that's called a function pointer. :) –  Xeo Feb 14 '12 at 11:28
    
I know what it is, but I thought you get something like void* function pointer so you need to cast it to the right type. My bad. –  NoSenseEtAl Feb 14 '12 at 12:26

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