Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a JTable with a custom cell editor. The editor implements FocusListener so I can check if the cell's contents is valid if the user clicks away from the cell.

I'd like to use a JOptionPane within focusLost (in the EventDispatchThread) to allow the user to select whether to revert to an old value or accept an adjusted value.

Here's the problem; if the user is editing a cell, then clicks a button away from the table, the button's actionlisteners are alerted before JOptionPane has returned.

This is what I'd like to happen:

  • User edits cell
  • User clicks button
  • Cell detects focus lost
  • JOptionPane displayed and user selects action
  • JOptionPane closes and cell's value set
  • Button's actionListeners called

Instead, this is happening:

  • User edits cell
  • User clicks button
  • Cell detects focus lost
  • JOptionPane displayed and user selects action
  • Button's actionListeners called
  • JOptionPane closes and cell's value set

Is it possible to postpone the button's action events until after the JOptionPane has closed?

From other threads, I've read that JDialog does some magic to ensure event dispatching continues so the Dialog itself can handle events.

share|improve this question
    
Yes, the JDialog does some magic because when you display the JDialog from the AWT-event queue you are actually preventing new events to be dispatched because the call to setVisible(true) on JDialog is blocking. In order to avoid this, the JDialog access the event queue and automatically dispatches the new incoming events. If you want to postpone an event after the currently handled event, you can use SwingUtilities.invokeLater(Runnable). The Runnable is executed after the end of the current event. –  Guillaume Polet Feb 14 '12 at 11:31
    
whatever you do, don't use a focusListener - especially in the context of table (or tree or combo) editing that's far too low-level and extremely hard to get right (remember: focus handling is highly OS dependent, the order of when happens what is unpredictable plus table itself interfers with internal magic) Go for something else ... –  kleopatra Feb 15 '12 at 12:36

2 Answers 2

Put your validation logic inside TableCellEditor#stopCellEditing(), showing your dialog and returning false if the value is not valid.

To automatically stop table editing on focus lost, use table.putClientProperty("terminateEditOnFocusLost", true);, but I don't think that will stop the buttons action listener from running. Instead I usually stop the table edit in the actionPerformed and do nothing when false is returned (or cancel editing when appropriate, for example if the action is to delete that table row).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but this isn't really what I'm looking for. The validation is working fine. –  Andy Feb 14 '12 at 12:40
    
@user1208882 validation is working fine I disagree: the validation in itself (decide whether or not a given input is valid) might be working, the overall process, including user interaction and preventing an action to be triggered, is not. –  kleopatra Feb 15 '12 at 12:40

From what I gather, you don't want the button's action-listener to activate at all, until AFTER the user selects the correct value from the JOptionPane.

To me it seems like the solution would be to set up a 'disabled' flag which goes up once the focusLost is triggered. Once the selection is made, the disabled flag goes down. When the button action is triggered, it checks if the form is disabled; if it is, it does nothing. If it isn't it continues as normal.

Notice the button event won't go automatically once the user selected something in the JOptionPane, but instead he will have to click the button again. To me this seems like better functionality then having the button 'clicked' again for him after he is required to change the form.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that does make a lot of sense, however, I can't think of tidy way to implement it. There are a lot of other GUI components that would need to be aware of the 'disable' flag. –  Andy Feb 14 '12 at 11:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.