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I'm making a new script generator for external program in Java. This language supports variables, but it is an untyped language. This is an example of the code i have written initially:

public class Var
{
    private String name;
    private String type;
    private float defaultValue;
    private float lowerBound;
    private float upperBound;
    private float value;
    private LinkedList<Float> valuesConstraint;
    private String description;
    private Category category;
    private LinkedList<CvarDependency> dependencies;
    ...
}

Usually the var type is Float, but it can be also a bool [0|1], String, or int. So I ended up to make this implementation:

abstract class Var
{
    private String name;
    ...
}

public class IntVar extends Var
{
    private int value;
    private int defaultValue;
    private int lowerBound; //-infinite
    private int upperbound; //+infinite
    ...
}

public class FloatVar extends Var
{
    private float value;
    private float defaultValue;
    private float lowerBound; //-infinite
    private float upperbound; //+infinite
    ...
}

public class StringVar extends Var
{
    private String value;
    private String defaultValue; //empty string
    ...
}

public class BoolVar extends Var
{
    private boolean value;
    private boolean defaultValue;
    private boolean lowerBound; //false <-> 0
    private boolean upperbound; //true  <-> 1
    ...
}

Now I have to store those vars into a LinkedList, but when I have to read its content how do I manage the proper casting? I have read that it is not a good practice to use this approach:

Var var = Manager.getVar("namevar");
if( var.getClass().getName().equals("StringVar") )
    ...
else if( var.getClass().getName().equals("IntVar") )
    ...
else if( var.getClass().getName().equals("FloatVar") )
    ...
else if( var.getClass().getName().equals("BoolVar") )
    ...

Any hint to better handle this problem?

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I would suggest a Visitor Pattern for each Var. That way, the visitor knows how to do the casting. –  Buhake Sindi Feb 14 '12 at 11:54
    
Ok this is the pattern i needed. Please post this comment as answer so I can put this in top of the stack of replies! –  Otacon Feb 14 '12 at 12:03
    
Can you use instanceOf operator? –  basav Feb 14 '12 at 12:05
    
Surely, but I want a "clean" implementation! –  Otacon Feb 14 '12 at 12:07
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4 Answers

Rather than having your interpreter extract and operate on the values directly, perhaps it would be better to take a different approach and define operations as methods like this:

abstract class Var
{
    ...
    public Var add(Var var); // corresponds to    var + otherVar;   in script
    public Var subtract(Var var); // corresponds to    var - otherVar;   in script
    public Var unarySubtract(); // corresponds to    -var;   in script
    ...
}

This way you can evaluate expressions in the script by calling these methods, and your classes can override and overload like this for example:

public class IntVar extends Var
{
    ...
    public IntVar add(IntVar var)
    {
      return new IntVar(value + var.value); // add another int
    }
    public FloatVar add(FloatVar var)
    {
      return new FloatVar(value + var.value); // add another float (and cast result to float? up to you whether you want to do this...)
    }
    public StringVar add(StringVar var)
    {
      return new StringVar("" + value + var.value); // add a string, and cast to string (for string concatenation)
    }
    public Var add(Var var)
    {
      throw new OperationNotSupportedException(); // no other types can be added to an IntValue so throw an exception
    }
    public Var subtract(Var var) {...}
    public IntVar unarySubtract()
    {
      return new IntVar(-value);
    }
    ...
}

This way you can implement and evaluate operations on them however you want without ever dealing with the values directly in the interpreter.

Another bonus is that using this method, if a user tries to run a bad script (tries to add a BoolVar to an IntVar for example) then an exception will be thrown in the interpreter.

Perhaps you could even have the default implementation of operations in your abstract Var class just be this:

public Var add(Var var)
{
  throw new OperationNotSupportedException(); // no other types can be added to an IntValue so throw an exception
}

And only override/overload with safe uses of the operations.

When you say 'read the content' here, presumably the content of an instance of a type will need to be dealt with in a uniform manner at some point at least, if this is just for output, then why not just have an abstract 'toString()' method? If for some other purpose than output, then what purpose is it that you could not just have some other toX() method and deal with each type instance in the same way?

I realise this doesn't answer your question directly and rather suggests a different approach in the hopes of avoiding the issue entirely, which may be completely unhelpful since I may have made some silly assumptions about what you are trying to achieve w/o having seen more of the context of the problem, but I hope it's helpful nonetheless.

If this is not helpful then please provide some more information and I will try to help a little more, because as it is I cannot recommend continuing with the current approach, but am unsure what else to suggest other than this.

Edit: Wait, my bad, I didn't read the question properly. This is not an interpreter, but a generator. What sort of generator? A generator of scripts of what language? Well, those may not be important issues, but now that I have reread the question I realise I don't really understand much about what you need to achieve.

I still think encapsulation is a better choice than the visitor pattern, in general though :). Unless of course there is some reason that behaviour will need to be added which can operate on any variable in such a way that the behaviour cannot be constructed from the behaviours already attached to each variable through the interface provided by Var... What behaviour might this be? For output, you will surely need each variable to be readable in a format common to all of them anyway, why not just toString(), toSomething(), toAnotherThing() etc.

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My suggestion is to use a Visitor pattern. The algorithm would be placed in the Visitor rather than on the object Var (and subclasses).

public class Var {

    public void accept(VarVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
}

Visitor

public interface VarVisitor {
    public void visit(FloatVar var);
    public void visit(IntVar var);
    public void visit(StringVar var);
    public void visit(BoolVar var);

    //...etc.
    public Object getValue();
}

VisitorImpl

public class VarVisitorImpl implements VarVisitor {
    private Object value;

    @Override
    public Object getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    @Override
    public void visit(FloatVar var) {

    }

    @Override
    public void visit(IntVar var) {

    }

    @Override
    public void visit(StringVar var) {

    }

    @Override
    public void visit(BoolVar var) {

    }
}

I hope this gives you an idea on what you want to achieve.

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You may use a generic type, but I do not know what you need to do with the members...

public class Var<T extends Comparable<T>>
{
    private String name;
    private String type;
    private T defaultValue;
    private T lowerBound;
    private T upperBound;
    private T value;
    private LinkedList<T> valuesConstraint;
    private String description;
    private Category category;
    private LinkedList<CvarDependency> dependencies;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
In fact i have to make some manipulations. It is easy to manage defaultValue, lowerBound, upperBound for int, bool and float, but not for Strings! –  Otacon Feb 14 '12 at 12:02
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Do not compare the name of the class, compare the class:

if( var.getClass().equals(IntVar.class) ) {
  IntVar intVar = (IntVar) var; 
  ...

You could also use var instanceof IntVar, but that could cause problems if you write a class that extends IntVar.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, thanks, but it is a "good practice" ??? :) –  Otacon Feb 14 '12 at 11:52
    
Yes, it is. But before the comparison, you should check that var is not null. –  Stephan Feb 14 '12 at 11:53
    
Surely and thx ;) –  Otacon Feb 14 '12 at 11:55
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