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I need to convert the linq query from generic ienumerable to arraylist.

ArrayList myArrayList = new ArrayList();
         var b =
              (from myObj in myCollection
           select new myClass
           {
            Name = myObj.Name,
            ac = myObj.ac
           });

I have tried doing

b.Cast<ArrayList>();

but it is not working.

Edited : I got it working with @devdigital solution

but i will also want to point out that at same time i found a hackish solution.

myArrayList.InsertRange(0, b.ToArray());
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new ArrayList(b); –  Jordão Feb 14 '12 at 12:18
    
The Cast<T> extension casts each element of an IEnumerable and returns them as another IEnumerable. It is therefore not useful to convert the collection itself. –  Matthias Meid Feb 14 '12 at 12:23
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One of the constructors for the ArrayList type takes an ICollection, so you should be able to do the following:

var b =
    (from myObj in myCollection
     select new myClass
    {
      Name = myObj.Name,
      ac = myObj.ac
    }).ToArray();

ArrayList myArrayList = new ArrayList(b);
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1  
Doesn't ArrayList need an ICollection? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Matthias Meid Feb 14 '12 at 12:19
    
    
Yeah, but this is parameter-less. I wanted to point out that ArrayList(IEnumerable) does not exist. –  Matthias Meid Feb 14 '12 at 12:30
3  
Yes, that's why b is converted to an array with ToArray(). System.Array implements ICollection. You could also use a List of course. –  devdigital Feb 14 '12 at 12:31
    
Oh, sorry! I missed this, this is my fault. –  Matthias Meid Feb 14 '12 at 12:33
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I'd suggest you to use a List<T> rather than an ArrayList. You can actually use the ToList extension method or the List's constructor which takes an IEnumerable<T>:

var myList = b.ToList(); // either
var myListTwo = new List<myClass>(b); // or

List<T> was newly introduced with .NET 2.0 and is generic. This means it yields you values of your actual type at compile-time, which is myClass, instead of object.

Edit: If you actually need an ArrayList, you need to copy b twice, as it cannot deal with IEnumerable directly, as devdigital pointed out in his reply:

ArrayList arrayList = new ArrayList(b.ToArray());
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3  
I'm assuming he needs an ArrayList for some legacy API. –  devdigital Feb 14 '12 at 12:28
    
OK thanks, edited my post. –  Matthias Meid Feb 14 '12 at 12:32
    
@devdigital yes, correct i am using an API –  AI25 Feb 14 '12 at 12:46
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You can convert your IEnumerable to an array with ToArray(), then construct an ArrayList from that array.

var b = (from myObj in myCollection
         select new myClass
         {
             Name = myObj.Name,
             ac = myObj.ac
         });
var myArrayList = new ArrayList(b.ToArray());
share|improve this answer
add comment
ArrayList arrayList = new ArrayList(b.ToList());
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