Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When a module class is not in my script but used by one of the modules (I did imported explicitly) how do I catch his error?

For example:

from sqlite3 import dbapi2 as sqlite

class sqldb:

def __init__(self):
  self.sqlite.connect('records.db')
  self.c = self.conn.cursor()    

def query(self,query,values)
 try:
  self.c.execute(query, values)
  self.conn.commit()
 except sqlite3.OperationalError:
  print "SQLite DB locked"

Will result in (when the database is locked):

NameError: global name 'sqlite3' is not defined

But when I don't catch the error it gives me exactly that exception: 'sqlite3.OperationalError'

So what should I put as Except ? Or should I just import the whole sqlite3 module? If yes, doesn't this increase the resources footprint of my program?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Or should I just import the whole sqlite3 module?

Yes.

If yes, doesn't this increase the resources footprint of my program?

No -- the module is imported anyway. All your import statement does is to add a reference to sqlite3 to your module's global namespace.

share|improve this answer

Put the following line at the top of your program:

import sqlite3

to tell Python to associate the name sqlite3 with the module.

Alternatively, you can explicitly import the error you are catching:

from sqlite3 import OperationalError

...

try:
    self.c.execute(query, values)
    self.conn.commit()
except OperationalError:
    print "SQLite DB locked"
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.