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I have two version of the same function and i am not sure which of the two i should pick. They do the same thing, but i wonder if there is a "right way" to do it or if it is only a question of aesthetics.

//both functions have to start at the second element
int multiFileHandler_1(char **files, int filenumber)
{

filenumber = filenumber - 1;
*files++;
while(filenumber--)
{
printf("%s\n", *files); 
fileOpen(*files);   
}
return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}



int multiFileHandler_2(char **files, int filenumber)
{
    char **file;
    for (file = &files[1]; *file != '\0'; file++)
    {
        printf("%s\n", *file);  
        fileOpen(*file);
    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

I read have read a few texts about code readability and a few leaned towards using for since it places all the important information into one block. But the while version looks a tiny bit neater.

EDIT: Ah, stackoverflow is quite a learning experience. Shows me how much of a n00b i am. :P

share|improve this question
2  
If you think the while version looks neater, use the while version. – James McLaughlin Feb 14 '12 at 13:09
    
The two loops do different things. – David Heffernan Feb 14 '12 at 13:10
1  
for (file = &files[1]; *file != '\0'; file++) needs the guaranteed delimiter in the last char* field '\0' (otherwise it runs out of bounds), which is not necessary in the first version. So no aesthetics but syntactic differences. – Bort Feb 14 '12 at 13:13
    
You are right, i didn't think about that. Thank you. :) – Plastefuchs Feb 14 '12 at 13:14
2  
Yeah, you are comparing apples and pears, version 2 does not use the filenumber argument. Anyway, I'd prefer the for version which makes it more obvious you are doing a complete and regular array traversal. And please avoid to hide the progression mechanism *file++ within a function call. – Yves Daoust Feb 14 '12 at 13:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

With the first loop you depend on a second argument, filenumber, in order to iterate through the list. In the second example you use a null-terminator in order to identify the end of the list, therefore eliminating the need for a second parameter.

I'd prefer the second example with the for loop. To me it looks cleaner (although it can still be improved as others have pointed out.) Although this also means it depends on that null-terminator, and if it's not present you have problems.

share|improve this answer
    
The good thing is that i know that in that case it is null-terminated. I have to keep in mind that it will be in all the other cases i might use it for. – Plastefuchs Feb 14 '12 at 13:36
    
You should stick to one way of maintaining the list length. Null-terminated is OK, but then throw away filenumber. Else, everywhere you modify the list you'll have two things to worry about. – ugoren Feb 14 '12 at 13:39

If your array is NULL-terminated, I think that the right (and aesthetic) way is to use this, so I was choosing the second way.

BTW, You probably meant *file != NULL instead of *file != '\0' (because *file is a pointer). You can write just *file.

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1  
It's only useful for obfuscation, but *file != '\0' is also a correct way to write the condition. '\0' is just a circumspect 0, which is a null pointer constant in pointer contexts. – Daniel Fischer Feb 14 '12 at 13:23
    
@DanielFischer No it is not correct, because NULL might not necessarily evaluate to the integer literal 0. Check the C FAQ. – Lundin Feb 14 '12 at 13:36
    
More knowledge with every moment! =) – Plastefuchs Feb 14 '12 at 13:37
    
@Lundin That's not the important thing. The important issue is that an integer constant expression with value 0 evaluates to a null pointer in a pointer context - 6.3.2.3 (3). – Daniel Fischer Feb 14 '12 at 13:44
    
@DanielFischer you are right, of course. I said it for aesthetic reasons. – asaelr Feb 14 '12 at 14:00

If you want to skip the first element always, and know that it's not NULL, but the remainder is NULL terminated, I would do it like this:

for (files++; *files != NULL; files++)
{
    printf("%s\n", *files);
}
share|improve this answer

It depends on how the array size is determined.
It's best to stick to one way of doing it, and not mix two. So if your function gets a filenumber parameter, it should use it.
It is OK to determine the end of the list by a null, but then you don't need the size parameter.

So I recommend a variation of your first method, which seems clearer to me:

for (int i=0; i<filenumber; i++) {
   printf("%s\n", files[i]);  
}
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