Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a client who has requested for me to build them a website with a very user friendly way to update content. They have expressed familiarity with wordpress, and expressed interest in being able to use the wordpress front-end to update their content.

I had originally intended to build them a simple admin page, where they can create posts, or add other types of content.. but it seems like wordpress has most of the functionality already in place.

The main problem is that i am a RoR developer. I prefer to use haml for every thing I do, and have 100% full control over how the site works.

So i was hoping someone out there would have an idea of a way i could still build the site using rails and haml, but still allow my client to update using wordpress. I thought maybe i could access the wordpress api, and just pull the content and display it the way i want? or maybe i should go with another CMS.. like Refinery?

Honestly, I just really dont want to have to touch PHP, and preferably use haml, rather than html. O_o

share|improve this question
6  
Please don't cobble together something attempting to combine what you like with what your client wants, that some poor future maintainer is going to have to decode... –  Michael Berkowski Feb 14 '12 at 13:27
3  
Use WordPress. No sense in reinventing the wheel. The free time will allow you to pick up other projects where you CAN work in your preferred environment. –  MunkiPhD Feb 14 '12 at 13:52
5  
You are a hammer, and this is not a nail. There are times when you have to tell clients "I'm not the right guy for this job". You could still be involved in the project as you help them flesh out the requirements for the project, and you could help them find a competent PHP guy. However, the idea of cobbling together some horrible Frankenstinian RoR/Wordpress site makes me shudder. –  Marc Talbot Feb 14 '12 at 13:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This seems to be working for me (I'm loading from Wordpress as secondary database, hence the establish_connection() calls and overriding table_name. This should get most of the way there, giving you access to the Wordpress data as ActiveRecord objects. I haven't yet written the wrapper around Posts (WPPost) to make them a bit more user friendly from an API perspective, but this should work well for Rails-based display of Wordpress data.

class Term < ActiveRecord::Base
   establish_connection "wordpress-#{Rails.env}"
   self.table_name = "wp_terms"

   has_one :term_taxonomy
end


class TermTaxonomy < ActiveRecord::Base
   establish_connection "wordpress-#{Rails.env}"
   self.table_name = "wp_term_taxonomy"

   belongs_to :term
   has_many :term_relationship
end

class TermRelationship < ActiveRecord::Base
   establish_connection "wordpress-#{Rails.env}"
   self.table_name = "wp_term_relationships"

   belongs_to :post, :foreign_key => "object_id"
   belongs_to :term_taxonomy
   has_one :term, :through => :term_taxonomy
end

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
   establish_connection "wordpress-#{Rails.env}"
   self.table_name = "wp_posts"

   has_many :term, :through => :term_relationship
   has_many :term_relationship, :foreign_key => "object_id"
   has_one  :postmeta

   # we only care about published posts for notifications
   default_scope where("post_type = 'post' and post_status = 'publish'")
end

class Postmeta < ActiveRecord::Base
   establish_connection "wordpress-#{Rails.env}"
   self.table_name = "wp_postmeta"

   belongs_to :post
end

I then wrap up the category in a simple ruby object that makes accessing the data easy:

class WPCategory
   attr_accessor :id
   attr_accessor :name
   attr_accessor :description
   attr_accessor :term

   def self.categories()
      categories = Term.all()
      categories = categories.select{|term| term.term_taxonomy.taxonomy == "category"}
      return categories.map{|term| WPCategory.new(term)}
   end

   def self.category(id=nil)
      if id
         term = Term.find(id)
         if term.term_taxonomy.taxonomy == "category"
            return WPCategory.new(term)
         end
      end
      return nil
   end

   def initialize(term)
      @id = term.term_id
      @name = term.name
      @description = term.term_taxonomy.description
      @term = term
   end

   def to_s
      return "Wordpress Category: '#{@name}' (id=#{@id})"
   end

end

Here's my database.yml (make sure that your db user has read-only access to the wordpress db to avoid any ActiveRecord mishaps):

test:
        adapter: mysql2
        encoding: utf8
        database: test-rails
        pool: 5
        username: test
        password: XXXXXX
        socket: /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock

wordpress-test:
        adapter: mysql2
        encoding: utf8
        database: test-wordpress
        pool: 5
        username: test
        password: XXXXXXX
        socket: /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock

wordpress-development:
        adapter: mysql2
        encoding: utf8
        database: wordpress
        pool: 5
        username: dev
        password: XXXXXX
        socket: /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock

development:
        adapter: mysql2
        encoding: utf8
        database: dev
        pool: 5
        username: dev
        password: XXXXXX
        socket: /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
share|improve this answer

The Museum of Modern Art had a WordPress JSON API plugin built for this exact purpose: https://github.com/dphiffer/wp-json-api

This allowed them to build a RoR-based front-end layer while maintaining a WordPress-driven back-end layer.

share|improve this answer

You could install Wordpress then reproduce the wordpress database as Models and add the associations like wordpress uses them. Then you would be able to access the data using rails that were entered in the wordpress frontend. I did something like this in the past but not as a permanent solution but as a datasource for migration to another solution. Its possible, its not nice but it works.

But one question: Why are you using wordpress for a thing its not mighty enough?! Its a CMS not a framework for challenging tasks. If it doesnt fit the needs of the costumer its simply not the right thing to use. You could rather build a similar GUI using rails then fiddling with wordpress.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you know where i would be able to find more information about this? Like what the actual models they use and what their relations are. –  BananaNeil Feb 16 '12 at 0:08
    
You have to reverse engine it! Use the mysql console using show tablesand show columns from table_name to demiter what their tables and fields are. But like I said its bad style... –  davidb Feb 16 '12 at 12:23

Concerning HAML, you can still write your views in haml, and then use haml input.haml output.html on the command line. A bit boring, but you don't have to write html.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.