Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to update Medusa to allow decorated POCOs to be used anywhere it currently uses List<DbParameter>. The problem I'm running into is that the wrong overload is being called. Here is a simple example of what I'm seeing:

void Run()
{
    CallDoSomething<Program>("Hello World", new object());
    CallDoSomething<Program>("Hello World2", new List<int>());
}

// `DoSomething<T>` represents the functions that do the heavy lifting
public T DoSomething<T>(string someString, List<int> ints) where T : class
{
    Console.WriteLine("List<int>: {0}", someString);
    return default(T);
}
public T DoSomething<T>(string someString, object ints) where T : class
{
    Console.WriteLine("object: {0}", someString);
    // In my real implementation, this turns the object to a typed List<T>
    // and passes it to the previous overload.
    return default(T);
}

// We're trying to refactor the code in this method to reduce code duplication in
// the `CallDoSomething<T>` methods that will actually be called by the end user
internal T CallDoSomething<T, U>(string someString, U ints) where T : class
{
    // Do a bunch of stuff here that would otherwise be duplicated by the `CallDoSomething<T>` methods
    return DoSomething<T>(someString, ints);
}

public T CallDoSomething<T>(string someString, List<int> ints) where T : class
{
    return CallDoSomething<T, List<int>>(someString, ints);
}
public T CallDoSomething<T>(string someString, object ints) where T : class
{
    return CallDoSomething<T, object>(someString, ints);
}

In this case, the resulting output is:

object: Hello World
object: Hello World2

While I was expecting it to be:

object: Hello World
List<int>: HelloWorld2

It kind of makes sense that both cases were directed to the overload taking an object parameter since both of them are objects. I suspect this is happening because (from what I know) Generics and overload resolution are handled at compile time rather than runtime.

The first alternative that came to me was to use Reflection to invoke the call dynamically in CallDoSomething<T, U>, but that felt too dirty. Instead the solution I've come up with involves passing a delegate to CallDoSomething<T, U> which seems to work. Here's what it looks like:

void Run()
{
    CallDoSomething<Program>("Hello World", new object());
    CallDoSomething<Program>("Hello World2", new List<int>());
}

public T DoSomething<T>(string someString, List<int> ints) where T : class
{
    Console.WriteLine("List<int>: {0}", someString);
    return default(T);
}
public T DoSomething<T>(string someString, object ints) where T : class
{
    Console.WriteLine("object: {0}", someString);
    return default(T);
}

internal delegate T DoSomethingDelegate<T, U>(string someString, U ints) where T : class;
internal T CallDoSomething<T, U>(string someString, U ints, DoSomethingDelegate<T, U> doSomething) where T : class
{
    // Do a bunch of stuff here that would otherwise be duplicated by the `CallDoSomething<T>` methods
    return doSomething(someString, ints);
}

public T CallDoSomething<T>(string someString, List<int> ints) where T : class
{
    return CallDoSomething<T, List<int>>(someString, ints, DoSomething<T>);
}
public T CallDoSomething<T>(string someString, object ints) where T : class
{
    return CallDoSomething<T, object>(someString, ints, DoSomething<T>);
}

This seems to work and it removes a large amount of code duplication, but it makes the code fairly convoluted. Is there a better way to approach this problem?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, the overload is resolved at compile-time. You can force it to be evaluated at execution time if you're using C# 4, like this:

internal T CallDoSomething<T, U>(string someString, U ints) where T : class
{
    dynamic d = ints;
    return DoSomething<T>(someString, d);
}

However, personally I'd try to simplify your design if you possibly can. This sort of thing gets messy very quickly.

share|improve this answer
    
I am in .NET 4, so dynamic crossed my mind but I didn't think it would make much difference since ints is already a generic. It makes sense though. Any advice to simplify the design? – M.Babcock Feb 14 '12 at 15:07
    
@M.Babcock: generic and dynamic are very different. Generics are about providing more type information at compile time; dynamic is about using more type information at execution time. As for simplifying the design - it's hard to say without knowing more context. – Jon Skeet Feb 14 '12 at 15:12
    
Thanks for your help. I'll probably stick with the delegates just to allow usage outside of .NET 4. While the delegate solution seems to work, do you know of any reason not to go this way? – M.Babcock Feb 14 '12 at 15:15
    
@M.Babcock: Only simplicity. It feels like there should probably be a simpler approach... – Jon Skeet Feb 14 '12 at 15:24
    
I agree. Thanks again. – M.Babcock Feb 14 '12 at 15:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.