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I'm working on an application I inherited which has a lot of overly broad exceptions built in, it uses try/catch blocks but completely ignores the exception (in most cases) and steps over. I'd like to wrap in a better custom exception model, but my custom exception itself keeps coming back unhandled. How would I go about throwing an exception that I can log, and marking the exception as handled to continue execution?

In the example, I am getting into the finally block, and am getting into ExpectedExeptionType. It's still, however, throwing an unhandled exception which stops the thread execution with the pop-up box. Is there a way for me to throw the exception, use it to log the message, and continue processing (count my exception as handling it)?

Example:

Module Module1

Sub Main()

    Dim a As Integer
    Console.WriteLine("Please enter an integer and then press enter.")
    Try
        a = Console.ReadLine()
        Console.WriteLine("You entered the value " & a.ToString)
        Console.WriteLine("Press enter to continue")
        Console.ReadLine()
    Catch ex As Exception            
        Throw New ExpectedExceptionType("Bad")            
    Finally
        'Clean up objects/whatever and continue
        Console.WriteLine("TEST")
        Console.ReadLine()
    End Try

    Console.WriteLine("Hi there, press enter to exit!")
    Console.ReadLine()
End Sub

Public Class ExpectedExceptionType
    Inherits Exception

    Public Sub New()            
    End Sub

    Public Sub New(ByVal Message As String)
        MyBase.New(Message)
        Console.WriteLine("I know I'm getting into the exception.")
    End Sub

    Public Sub New(ByVal Message As String, ByVal Inner As Exception)
        MyBase.New(Message)
    End Sub

End Class

End Module

share|improve this question
    
"I am not getting into the finally block" --> The finally block is always run, whether or not there is an exception. –  Meta-Knight Feb 14 '12 at 15:11
    
Sorry, you're right there. It does make it to the finally - it's the unhandled exception firing first that I'm trying to figure out. I'll rephrase the question ... but really I'm curious as to why I get an unhandled exception generated from my custom exception. –  iivel Feb 14 '12 at 15:19
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the Catch, you're throwing an ExpectedExceptionType but never handling it. Let's say you had such code:

Sub Main()
    Try
        MethodWhichCanThrow()
    Catch ex as ExpectedExceptionType
        'Log exception here, but don't stop execution
        Console.WriteLine("Expected exception: " & ex.ToString())
    End Try
    'Some more code here
End Sub

Sub MethodWhichCanThrow()
    If someCondition Then
        Throw New ExpectedExceptionType("This error is expected")
    End If
    'Do something if there's no error here
End Sub

You can see that we have a Catch statement which catches only the expected exception type. So in this case, if you have some other unexpected exception, it will crash, but if you have the expected error, it will bypass code from MethodWhichCanThrow but continue executing the rest of the code.

I will also add that if some error condition is expected, and if it's possible to validate this error with some method which doesn't throw, it's preferable to use this method. For example, this:

Dim number As Integer
If Integer.TryParse(value, number) Then
    Console.WriteLine("Converted '{0}' to {1}.", value, number)
Else
    Console.WriteLine("Conversion failed")
End If 

...is preferable to this:

Dim number As Integer
Try
    number = Int32.Parse(value)
    Console.WriteLine("Converted '{0}' to {1}.", value, number)
Catch e As FormatException
    Console.WriteLine("Conversion failed")
End Try

In this case, the try-catch version is not too bad, but you still have to know which type of exception is thrown, and in which case. Also, in real-world code having a lot of try-catch statements makes code harder to follow.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, that makes so much sense. Why this simple explanation doesn't show up on any of the structured error handling pages (that I could find) in MSDN is beyond me. Thanks. –  iivel Feb 14 '12 at 15:57
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