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Can anybody elaborate below in innerF, what does this refer to? User or innerF?

function User(){
  this.id = 1;
};

User.prototype.sayHi = function(){
    var innerF = function(){
        this.id = 2; // "this" refers to User or innerF ?
    };

    return innerF;
};

Also does the new keyword or anonymous function has to do with changing reference of this keyword?

What if I call it all like this:

var u = User;
var f = u.sayHi();
f();

Or

var u = new User;
var f = u.sayHi();
f();

Thanks

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why don't you try? :) –  Rene Pot Feb 14 '12 at 15:49
1  
@Topener: I don't know how to try that, learning JS :) –  Dev555 Feb 14 '12 at 15:50
    
@Topener: Seems like I managed to call it. –  Dev555 Feb 14 '12 at 15:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What the this local refers to inside of innerF will depend on how the function is eventually invoked. It can be invoked in a variety of ways that will change the meaning of this. For example

var u = new User();
var innerF = u.sayHi();
innerF();              // 'this' is window
innerF.call(u);        // 'this' is 'u'
innerF.call("hello");  // 'this' is "hello"

Based on your code though it appears that you want this to refer to the instance of User on which sayHi was invoked. If so then you need to store this in a local and refer to that local within innerF.

User.prototype.sayHi = function(){
    var self = this;
    var innerF = function(){
        self.id = 2; 
    };

    return innerF;
};

Note though that this inside sayHi isn't guaranteed to point to User instance either. In general it will the same tricks can be done to sayHi that were done to innerF. For example

var sayHi = u.sayHi;
sayHi();   // 'this' is window
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but I want to make this refer to innerF, I have also provided code to run it. –  Dev555 Feb 14 '12 at 15:58
    
Thanks it is clear now :) –  Dev555 Feb 14 '12 at 16:02
    
@Dev555: You want this refer to the function itself? Why don't you use innerF.id = ... then instead of this? –  Felix Kling Feb 14 '12 at 16:08
    
@Dev555 If you want this to refer to something specific, you have to bind it to that explicitly using call() (as this answer shows) or bind() –  millimoose Feb 14 '12 at 16:14

You're not calling the function in that code, so it doesn't refer to anything yet.

The value of this is determined when you call the function, not define it (unless you use something like bind).

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Can you elaborate how calling affects reference of this ? With code. Thanks –  Dev555 Feb 14 '12 at 15:54
    
@Dev555: Do some research, read some documentation: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/this –  Felix Kling Feb 14 '12 at 15:57
var u = User;
var f = u.sayHi();
f();

The code above will throw error. User is a function, not a User object, so it doesn't have the method sayHi, so you will get error of below.

Uncaught TypeError: Object function User(){
  this.id = 1;
} has no method 'sayHi'

var u = new User;
var f = u.sayHi();
f();

The code above will not throw error, and u is an object of User, (how new worksfrom mdn), and it's method sayHi return a function, and you execute the function by f();, so the this inside of the function is refer the current context when the function be called. So if your code is in global scope, the this is referring the window object.

And you could set the context by f.call(u);, then the this is referring the object u, and you changed the User object u's id to 2.

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