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I am currently using the below text as a simple way of hiding and displaying my text. What I was trying to do though also was use the css to display the a tag with a background image:

one to have a plus symbol for when the text is hidden.

Then one to have a minus symbol for when the text is displayed and you want to hide the text again.


JavaScript:

function toggle() {
    var ele = document.getElementById("toggleText");
    var text = document.getElementById("displayText");
    if(ele.style.display == "block") {
        ele.style.display = "none";
        text.innerHTML = "Show";
    }
    else {
        ele.style.display = "block";
        text.innerHTML = "Hide";    
    }
} 

HTML:

<a id="displayText" href="javascript:toggle();">Show Further Details & Specification</a>
<div id="toggleText" style="display: none"><h1>peek-a-boo</h1></div>
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to set up the CSS for "displayText" to give it a background.

Something like this:

#displayText {
    display:block;
    height:20px;
    padding-left:30px;
    background-image:url(../images/plus.png);
}

Then swap the image for the alternate state:

#displayText.active {
    background-image:url(../images/minus.png);
}

So in your code you'll need to add/remove the "active" class name on displayText based on the toggle state.

P.S. It's considered bad form to used "href" for JS events. It's better to use onclick.

<a id="displayText" href="javascript://"  onclick="toggle();">
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Next time try to post your code in jsfiddle there are some issues with your code, first is better to put event handlers rather than put the javascript code in the href property, is easier to use a variable to save the state of the toggle button. Works almost 99% of the times if you show your elements with inline rather than block

var textHidden = true;
function toggle() {
var ele = document.getElementById("toggleText");
var text = document.getElementById("displayText");
if(textHidden) {
    ele.style.display = "inline";
    text.innerHTML = "Show";
    textHidden = false

}
else {
    textHidden = true
    ele.style.display = "none";
    text.innerHTML = "Hide";

}
}​

html:

<a id="displayText" href="#" onclick="toggle();">Show Further Details Specification</a>    
<div id="toggleText" style="display:none;"><h1>peek-a-boo</h1></div>​
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thankyou, it has worked great. I have used the onclick rather than putting it in href. –  Suzi Larsen Feb 15 '12 at 16:35
    
Is there any reason as to why you define the ele and text variables inside the function, rather than outside it? –  JNat Apr 12 at 11:20
    
No, but actually if you want to improve performance in IE 6 and 7, you should set to null all variables not used anymore (like ele and text at the end of the function), so they can be garbage collected. –  pacofvf Apr 28 at 14:10

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