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I am trying to write a program in C that prints bits of int. for some reason i get wrong values,

void printBits(unsigned int num){
    unsigned int size = sizeof(unsigned int);
    unsigned int maxPow = 1<<(size*8-1);
    printf("MAX POW : %u\n",maxPow);
    int i=0,j;
    for(;i<size;++i){
        for(j=0;j<8;++j){
            // print last bit and shift left.
            printf("%u ",num&maxPow);
            num = num<<1;
        }
    }
}

My question, first why am i getting this result (for printBits(3)).

MAX POW : 2147483648 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 2147483648 214748364 8

second is there a better way to do this ?

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Is this what you want? stackoverflow.com/questions/1024389/… –  David Feb 14 '12 at 16:43
    
Is that really the output, or is the formatting broken? It doesn't match the print statements ... Oh, and you don't say what value you're passing in for num, either –  Useless Feb 14 '12 at 16:44
    
@Useless fixed question, output is for printBits(3). –  sam ray Feb 14 '12 at 16:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You are calculating the result correctly, but you are not printing it right. Also you do not need a second loop:

for(;i<size*8;++i){
    // print last bit and shift left.
    printf("%u ",num&maxPow ? 1 : 0);
    num = num<<1;
}

If you'd like to show off, you could replace the conditional with two exclamation points:

printf("%u ", !!(num&maxPow));
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The result you get is because num&maxPow is either 0 or maxPow. To print 1 instead of maxPow, you could use printf("%u ", num&maxPow ? 1 : 0);. An alternative way to print the bits is

while(maxPow){
    printf("%u ", num&maxPow ? 1 : 0);
    maxPow >>= 1;
}

i.e. shifting the bitmask right instead of num left. The loop ends when the set bit of the mask gets shifted out.

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you are correct, shifting the bitmask might seem more intuative them shifting the number. –  sam ray Feb 14 '12 at 16:58

To address point two, I'd consider the following, which is simplified a bit for ease of understanding.

void printBits(unsigned int num)
{
   for(int bit=0;bit<(sizeof(unsigned int) * 8); bit++)
   {
      printf("%i ", num & 0x01);
      num = num >> 1;
   }
}
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void print_bits(unsigned int x)
{
    int i;
    for(i=8*sizeof(x)-1; i>=0; i--) {
        (x & (1 << i)) ? putchar('1') : putchar('0');
    }
    printf("\n");
}
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