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Could someone explain this to me?

var diagramImage = new Kinetic.Shape(function () {
    var context = this.getContext();
    context.beginPath();
    context.lineWidth = 1;
    //This is crazy tricks. It's part of the KineticJS demo website, but how am I able to assign diagramImage.color here?
    context.strokeStyle = diagramImage.color;

    var lastVertice = polygon.Vertices[polygon.Vertices.length - 1];

    context.moveTo(lastVertice.X, lastVertice.Y);

    for (var i = 0; i < polygon.Vertices.length; i++) {
        var vertice = polygon.Vertices[i];
        context.lineTo(vertice.X, vertice.Y);
    }

    context.stroke();
    context.closePath();
});

It seems to me that diagramImage does not exist until the Kinetic constructor returns, but I am able (and seem to need to) assign context's strokeStyle to diagramImage's color -- before diagramImage has been created? Why does this work?

EDIT: Full code:

function DrawPolygon(diagramLayer, polygon) {
    var diagramImage = new Kinetic.Shape(function () {
        var context = this.getContext();
        context.beginPath();
        context.lineWidth = 2;
        //This is crazy tricks. It's part of the KineticJS demo website, but how am I able to assign diagramImage.color here?
        context.strokeStyle = diagramImage.color;

        var lastVertice = polygon.Vertices[polygon.Vertices.length - 1];

        context.moveTo(lastVertice.X, lastVertice.Y);

        for (var i = 0; i < polygon.Vertices.length; i++) {
            var vertice = polygon.Vertices[i];
            context.lineTo(vertice.X, vertice.Y);
        }

        context.stroke();
        context.closePath();
    });

    diagramImage.color = "red";

    diagramImage.on("mouseover", function () {
        this.color = "green";
        diagramLayer.draw();
    });

    diagramImage.on("mouseout", function () {
        this.color = "red";
        diagramLayer.draw();
    });

    diagramLayer.add(diagramImage);
    planViewStage.add(diagramLayer);
}
share|improve this question
    
Is diagramImage already defined before this portion of code that you included? –  ziesemer Feb 14 '12 at 17:00
    
No. See this tutorial: html5canvastutorials.com/labs/html5-canvas-interactive-flower They do the same thing with the variable 'center' –  Sean Anderson Feb 14 '12 at 17:01
    
Do you have additional code that you can post that proves your assertions? –  shanabus Feb 14 '12 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Because where you are calling diagramImage.color is within a closure / function that is passed in to the Kinetic.Shape constructor. This function is not called / is not executed by the constructor until after the new instance created by the constructor is assigned to diagramImage.

Here's a minimal example that may better explain what's happening:

var MyObject = function(f){
  this.myFunc = f; // f is executed sometime later...
};
MyObject.prototype.execute = function(){
  this.myFunc();
};

var myObjInst = new MyObject(function(){
  console.log("myObjInst:", myObjInst);
});
myObjInst.execute();

As Twisol noted, this can be improved by using this instead. For example:

(function(){
  var MyObject = function(f){
    this.myFunc = f; // f is executed sometime later...
  };
  MyObject.prototype.execute = function(){
    this.myFunc();
  };

  var myObjInst = new MyObject(function(){
    console.log("myObjInst:", this);
  });
  myObjInst.execute();
})();

However, as Chris noted, unless documented by the API - there is no guarantee that this will refer to Kinetic.Shape during the callback - so continuing to use diagramImage here may still be the better of these 2 options.

In short, I think this is not the best API / example / use of JavaScript - and I would not consider this a nuance of JavaScript that you should have to deal with. Sure, these nuances are there if you need them - but you don't have to.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any way I can make this code more... intuitive? Or is this a nuance of Javascript that I will have to learn to love? :) –  Sean Anderson Feb 14 '12 at 17:06
    
Source (literally) here. drawFunc is called neither in Kinetic.Shape nor Kinetic.Node, but the fact that it's called drawFunc and kept as a property is telling. –  Twisol Feb 14 '12 at 17:09
1  
@SeanAnderson: Yes, use this in the function instead of diagramImage. That's okay to do here because where drawFunc is called, it provides the right object as this. –  Twisol Feb 14 '12 at 17:11
    
@SeanAnderson - Please review my updated answer. –  ziesemer Feb 14 '12 at 17:13
    
@ziesemer: Your first example prints myObjInst: undefined as well for me. In both cases, you're calling the provided method from the constructor, which is not what Kinetic.js does - it stores it for later. –  Twisol Feb 14 '12 at 17:13

That's an interesting construct. What's happening appears to be:

  • diagramImage is a reference before it's assigned anything just by virtue of the declaration. To visualize this, imagine that var diagramImage was on the previous line by its self.
  • Kinetic.Shape takes a callback, that anonymous function, as one of its constructor arguments to use later.
  • The callback wants to refer to the Kinetic.Shape object. Presumably there is some contract that describes what this refers to later (as evinced by the this.getContext() use), and it isn't the Kinetic.Shape object.
  • Because diagramImage is a reference, and by the time the reference will be used, it will have been assigned the new Kinetic.Shape, it's kosher to use it for said purpose.

In principle, this is no different from the usual pattern of using a local variable to make the current this available in a callback, e.g.

var self = this;
$('myelement').click( function(){ self.hi = true; } );

It's just that here, the variable being made available for later isn't the current object, it's a member of said object.

share|improve this answer

I think this post may help explain it - http://www.quirksmode.org/js/associative.html

Particularly the section on Associative Arrays. The write explains that objects in javascript are also considered associative arrays.

So event though diagramImage.strokeStyle may not be explicitly defined, you can still reference diagramImage['strokeStyle'].

Does that help?

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