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I was wondering if it would be possible having a "params" argument in a controller function, or something similar which would allow me to process X amount of entries in my form.

For instance, I have a form which has X amount of "name" elements, which are auto-generated through jQuery. An example of these name elements could be the following:

<input type="text" name="studentName1"></input>
<input type="text" name="studentName2"></input>
<input type="text" name="studentName3"></input>

Now, there's a different amount of student names every time, so this makes it quite complex for me to handle the form data in my controller. I had something like the following 2 examples in mind, but of course they wouldn't work in reality.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult PostStudentNames(params string[] studentNames)

Or:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult PostStudentNames(string[] formValues)

Can I achieve something similar to that?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I just want to chime in with a different approach you can use for this. If it's more convenient, you can model bind directly to collections of primitive or complex types. Here's 2 examples:

index.cshtml:

@using (Html.BeginForm("ListStrings", "Home"))
{
    <p>Bind a collection of strings:</p>

    <input type="text" name="[0]" value="The quick" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="[1]" value="brown fox" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="[2]" value="jumped over" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="[3]" value="the donkey" /><br />

    <input type="submit" value="List" />
}

@using (Html.BeginForm("ListComplexModel", "Home"))
{
    <p>Bind a collection of complex models:</p>

    <input type="text" name="[0].Id" value="1" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="[0].Name" value="Bob" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="[1].Id" value="2" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="[1].Name" value="Jane" /><br />

    <input type="submit" value="List" />
}

Student.cs:

public class Student
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

HomeController.cs:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }

    public ActionResult ListStrings(List<string> items)
    {
        return View(items);
    }

    public ActionResult ListComplexModel(List<Student> items)
    {
        return View(items);
    }
}

ListStrings.cshtml:

@foreach (var item in Model)
{
    <p>@item</p>
}

ListComplexModel.cshtml:

@foreach (var item in Model)
{
    <p>@item.Id. @item.Name</p>
}

The first form simply binds a list of strings. The second, binds the form data to a List<Student>. By using this approach, you can let the default model binder do some of the tedious work for you.

Updated for comment

Yes you can do that too:

Form:

@using (Html.BeginForm("ListComplexModel", "Home"))
{
    <p>Bind a collection of complex models:</p>

    <input type="text" name="[0].Id" value="1" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="[0].Name" value="Bob" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="[1].Id" value="2" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="[1].Name" value="Jane" /><br />
    <input type="text" name="ClassId" value="13" /><br />

    <input type="submit" value="List" />
}

Controller action:

public ActionResult ListComplexModel(List<Student> items, int ClassId)
{
    // do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can I combine this with an additional argument that I call "int ClassId", which comes from the form too? –  Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Feb 14 '12 at 18:01
1  
@MathiasLykkegaardLorenzen Yep, updated answer to show an example. As an aside, if you want to know how to use display templates with that data, Phil Haack covers the whole thing here. –  John H Feb 14 '12 at 18:06
    
Is it possible for this to work with link attributes too? –  Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Feb 14 '12 at 18:45
    
@MathiasLykkegaardLorenzen Can you give me an example of what you mean? –  John H Feb 14 '12 at 19:33
1  
@MathiasLykkegaardLorenzen This is a separate but common problem. Check Phil Haack's post on the subject and also this question for another perspective. –  John H Feb 14 '12 at 20:18

Mathias,

This works perfectly well without recourse to the params object. your form controls:

<input type="text" name="studentName" />
<input type="text" name="studentName" />
<input type="text" name="studentName" />
<input type="text" name="professorName" />

You would use the FormCollection object, which will contain all your form elements as either comma separated lists (if a control array) or as single properties. In the above example, this is what we'd get:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult PostStudentNames(FormCollection formValues)
{
    // basic check for rogue commas inside input controls
    // would need far more sophistication in a #real# app :)
    var valueStudents = formValues["studentName"].Split(',')
                          .Where(x => x.Length > 0).ToArray();
    var valueProfessor = formValues["professorName"];
    // other stuff
}

etc... At least, this is my recollection of this from a recent project. :)

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This is wonderful. I keep loving MVC more and more. –  Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Feb 14 '12 at 17:27
    
yeah - i almost 'gag' anytime i have to open up a webforms project for maintenance these days. mvc is just so 'right' (for me anyway - i know it's a matter of taste and style) –  jim tollan Feb 14 '12 at 17:51
    
if studentName input have ',' in value what happens –  Yorgo Feb 14 '12 at 17:52
    
Yorga - yes, in the primitive example that i made, that could happen. a check for dodgy commas would of course be a prescient objective. good catch - could use var valueStudents = formValues["studentName"].Split(',').Where(x => x.Length>0).ToArray(); of course. will update answer –  jim tollan Feb 14 '12 at 17:54
    
right and easy way to go. –  HaBo Feb 14 '12 at 19:14
<input type="text" name="studentName[0]"></input>
<input type="text" name="studentName[1]"></input>
<input type="text" name="studentName[2]"></input>

public ActionResult PostStudentNames(string[] studentName)
{
}
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