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I want to be able to target one record, and get back that record, and a variable amount of records on each side of it.

Like say you have a key id of 2356. So you need 2356 and the 3 records before and after 2356, with an order by on create_ts (for example).

I am wondering if there is a way to do this in one query (mysql)?

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what do you mean by that records? can you post some dummy records and your desired output? also the schema of your table. Thanks.. – John Woo Feb 14 '12 at 17:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The table (call it mytable) has to have a compound index on create_ts and id

ALTER TABLE mytable ADD INDEX create_ts_id_index (create_ts,id);

You evidently need two queries to pick up needed keys: 3 before id, the id itself, 3 after id.

That's 7 ids.

This query picks up 4 keys (id + 3 after)

SELECT create_ts,id FROM mytable WHERE id >= 2356 ORDER BY create_ts LIMIT 4;

This query picks up 4 keys (id + 3 before)

SELECT create_ts,id FROM mytable WHERE id < 2356 ORDER BY create_ts DESC LIMIT 4;

A UNION of the two queries should eliminate a duplicate of id 2356

Let's combine these and perform an INNER JOIN of it to mytable

SELECT B.* FROM
(
    SELECT * FROM
    (SELECT create_ts,id FROM mytable
    WHERE id >= 2356 ORDER BY create_ts
    LIMIT 4) AA
    UNION
    (SELECT create_ts,id FROM mytable
    WHERE id <= 2356 ORDER BY create_ts DESC
    LIMIT 4)
) A
INNER JOIN mytable B USING (create_ts,id)
ORDER BY A.create_ts,A.id;

The subquery A should only have 7 keys. Once those 7 keys are retrieved, the INNER JOIN should be quick.

Whenever you need N keys before and N keys after for this query, just use LIMIT N+1.

I would suggest this method because we can neither assume that 3 keys back is id-3, nor assume 3 keys after is id+3. This is especially true if the table has gaps in the ids for any reason.

Give it a Try !!!

CAVEAT : I did not try it out. This is what you want algorithmically. The MySQL syntax may or may not allow for it. It the syntax is not right, I'll try to construct an example and fix the syntax.

Just in case, here is a more stable approach.

CREATE TABLE create_ts_ids SELECT create_ts,id FROM mytable WHERE 1=2;
ALTER TABLE create_ts_ids ADD PRIMARY KEY (id);
INSERT INTO create_ts_ids
SELECT create_ts,id FROM mytable
WHERE id >= 2356 ORDER BY create_ts LIMIT 4;
INSERT IGNORE INTO create_ts_ids
SELECT create_ts,id FROM mytable
WHERE id <= 2356 ORDER BY create_ts DESC LIMIT 4;
SELECT B.* FROM create_ts_ids  A
INNER JOIN mytable B USING (create_ts,id)
ORDER BY A.create_ts,A.id;
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Thank you. I'll try this out and get back. – Spot Feb 14 '12 at 18:18
    
Okay this works (syntax). However the output is the target record first, then the after records, then the before records. Like so (432 is the target): 432, 482, 483, 484, 222, 221, 161 (notice the order of the before list as well). How would I fix this? – Spot Feb 14 '12 at 18:30
    
I updated my answer. I added ORDER BY A.create_ts,A.id. If that order is not right, try just ORDER BY A.id. – RolandoMySQLDBA Feb 14 '12 at 18:37
    
Perfection. Thank you sir! – Spot Feb 14 '12 at 18:43

If your criteria for selection is simply the id:

SELECT *
FROM table
WHERE key_id <= target_id + 3
AND key_id >= target_id - 3
ORDER BY create_ts;

Replace 3 with number of records desired around the target record.

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That only works if you have some contiguous integral column. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 14 '12 at 18:08
    
I am assuming here that key_id is a primary autoincrement key. But it looks like @Rolando inferred what the OP wanted more correctly. :) – JYelton Feb 14 '12 at 18:11
    
Correct, you don't want this since there is only a guarantee that the id is unique. There is no guarantee that the order is anyway correct. That why ORDER BY id ASC also totally wrong is. Sorting by some datetime column will give a correct result you can trust. – Luc Franken Feb 14 '12 at 18:17
    
@LucFranken: Not necessarily. If your data has sub-second resolution then your ordering is only correct to the one-second resolution level. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 14 '12 at 19:48
    
That's correct, in MySQL date-times won't support milliseconds, if you need to be more specific with milliseconds. The note is mostly focussed on the fact that the id's don't have to be always in order. – Luc Franken Feb 14 '12 at 19:58

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