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The .NET 4.5 framework libraries integrate C#-style Task-based async fairly extensively. In many cases, they also continue to expose APM-style Begin/End method pairs. F# can easily adapt either method to F#-style asynchronous computations.

My question is, given an IO-bound operation that's implemented in the framework as both Begin/End and Task-based async, is there a performance or memory advantage to choosing one over the other when adapting to F# async?

For example, in .NET 4.5, System.IO.Stream has both BeginRead and ReadAsync. That means I can do this...

type System.IO.Stream with
    member x.AsyncRead(buffer, offset, count) =
        Async.FromBeginEnd(buffer, offset, count, x.BeginRead, x.EndRead)

Or I can do this...

type System.IO.Stream with
    member x.AsyncRead(buffer, offset, count) =
        x.ReadAsync(buffer, offset, count) |> Async.AwaitTask

Is there any reason to prefer one over the other? The main difference that I can think of is that the read operation will have already started when the second extension method returns, but not so with the first extension method.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

An AsyncRead extension method (implemented in terms of FromBeginEnd) is already defined in FSharp.Core. AwaitTask is just a thin wrapper over Task.ContinueWith. So it boils down to a comparison of Task and async--which is more efficient, or right for the job. Since you're working with asyncs, the only relevant difference would be performance. I'm not an expert on this, but I think async and Task address the same issue, with Task having an edge for CPU-bound operations.

EDIT

I didn't read your question carefully enough. I don't know the definitive answer, but given that Task and async are roughly equivalent, I don't see any reason to wrap a Task with an async unless it's your only option. Begin/End methods are a lower-level, more lightweight abstraction, and therefore seem like better building blocks for asyncs.

An ancillary thought: the fact that AsyncRead wasn't changed to use Task could be instructive.

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1  
I'm aware that AsyncRead already exists, that was just an example. My question is, given an IO-bound operation that's implemented in the framework as both Begin/End and Task-based async, is there a performance or memory advantage to choosing one over the other when adapting to F# async? – Joel Mueller Feb 14 '12 at 19:49
    
Ah, sorry...I didn't read your question carefully enough. I don't know the answer, but I would go with FromBeginEnd because it adds the least overhead. Building an async on top of Task seems superfluous for anything other than interop. – Daniel Feb 14 '12 at 20:01
    
Well, hopefully there's not much overhead, because when C# 5 goes live, I have a feeling we're going to be doing a lot of building an async on top of Task... Given that Task-based async is simply the way async is done in C# 5, I was hoping someone would know how well it's been optimized in .NET 4.5 compared to what we're accustomed to in F#. – Joel Mueller Feb 14 '12 at 20:55
    
The event-based asynchronous pattern has been around much longer than Task, so I suspect there will almost always be (at least in the BCL) a Begin/End alternative available. Everything else fits in the interop category, and interop is rarely optimally efficient. – Daniel Feb 14 '12 at 21:01
2  
StreamReader.ReadToEndAsync is one example of a place in the BCL that uses Task-based async with no Begin/End alternative available. I doubt they would drop any existing Begin/End pairs, but I expect to see a proliferation of Task-only async in new API's. – Joel Mueller Feb 14 '12 at 23:53

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