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i have a question about the branchtables.

There are two ways to declare such a table:

  1. in the Data Sector (DS)
  2. in the Code Sector (CS)

Whats the different between this methods?

I've learned it this the following examples: Case 1:

 SECTION  .data 
 i            dd        2;
 stab         dd        m1,m2,m3 ; branchtable for switch

 SECTION  .text
 global       start
 start: 
 mov  ebx ,   [ i ]          ;       switch   ( i )  
 cmp  ebx ,   1 ;  
 jl   end 
 cmp  ebx ,   3 
 jg   end 
 shl   ebx ,   2 ;       / ∗   stab  4  Bytes   ∗ /
 jmp   [ stab+ebx −4];      
 m1: ;do something.....
 ....

Case 2:

 SECTION  .data 
 i            dd        2;

 SECTION  .text
 global       start
 start: 
 mov  ebx ,   [ i ]          ;       switch   ( i )  
 cmp  ebx ,   1 ;  
 jl   end 
 cmp  ebx ,   3 
 jg   end 
 shl   ebx ,   2 ;       / ∗   stab  4  Bytes   ∗ /
 jmp   [ cs : ebx+stab −4];  branchtable in codesegment
 ALIGN  4 ;     
 stab         dd        m1,m2,m3 
 m1: ; do something
 ....

Our prof told us, that method 2 is more effectiv but why? Because to the branchtable it's only a short jump and we doesn't need to show in the DS?

greetz destiny

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3  
Perhaps because in the second case the caches are likely to have already prefetched the memory locations containing the table called stab? –  Peter de Rivaz Feb 14 '12 at 19:12
1  
Like Peter, I think it has to do with cache locality, but I don't have any hard facts. I can say, though, that all the compiler-generated code I've seen (a lot) has always had the jump tables in the code segment. –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 14 '12 at 19:28
    
ah okay, its only more effectiv because it execute align which cached the content of stab? –  destiny Feb 14 '12 at 19:31
1  
No, "align 4" just ensures that the next byte starts at an address divisible by 4. –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 14 '12 at 19:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

which method is more effective depends on the processor you are dealing with, however, I beg to differ with your prof, using CS requires a segment prefix override, making the code bigger, thus longer to process and less cache friendly. but on x86 windows (userland), CS and DS flatten out to the same linear address space, making it a moot optimization.

Certain processors (Intel Atom) also have slower access to CS when the segment base is non-zero, though under x64 this falls away as all segments apart from FS and GS are ignored (their base is implicity 0), due to x64's flat addressing model. It should also be noted that Intel advises the use of as few segment registers as possible (this ease the burden on the register renamer).

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thanks for the great comment –  destiny Feb 14 '12 at 23:54

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