Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a enum as

public enum Operation
{
    Add = 1,
    Substract = 2,
    Multiply = 3,
    Divide = 4
}

I have four radio buttons : Add, Subtract, Multiply, Divide.

Based on the selection, I want to return the corresponding Enum value. All my radio buttons are present in a groupbox.

I know this is a simple thing, but from long time I am not able to get it right. Thanks.

EDIT

Thats what I have tried....

    public Operation Operation
    {
        get
        {
            foreach (Control control in gbxOperation.Controls)
            {
                var radioButton = control as radioButton;
                if (radioButton != null && radioButton.Checked)
                {
                    if(radioButton.Text.ToLower() == "add")
                        return Operation.Add;
                    if (radioButton.Text.ToLower() == "subtract")
                        return Operation.Substract;
                    if (radioButton.Text.ToLower() == "multiply")
                        return Operation.Multiply;
                    if (radioButton.Text.ToLower() == "divide")
                        return Operation.Divide;
                }
            }
            return Operation.Add;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
2  
WPF or WinForms? –  Paolo Moretti Feb 14 '12 at 19:42
3  
Winforms? Webforms? WPF? MVC? WP7? Silverlight? Metro? MonoTouch? MonoDroid? –  Oded Feb 14 '12 at 19:42
    
Please show the code for the radio buttons' events. –  mbeckish Feb 14 '12 at 19:42
    
Rrturn from what? –  Ben Robinson Feb 14 '12 at 19:42
2  
Metro? WinForms? WPF? Silverlight? ASP.Net? MonoTouch? –  SLaks Feb 14 '12 at 19:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not very clear from your question, but if you have a string like "Add" and you want to convert it to Operation, you can use Enum.Parse(). Something like:

Operation op = (Operation)Enum.Parse(typeof(Operation), s);

But probably a better option would be to associate the radio buttons with the enum values directly, not through the text of the button. How exactly to do that depends on what kind UI library are you using.

share|improve this answer

You can use the RadioButton's Tag property for that purpose:

in the constructor after InitializeComponent():

addButton.Tag = Operation.Add;
subtractButton.Tag = Operation.Subtract;
addButton.Tag = Operation.Multiply;
addButton.Tag = Operation.Divide;

public Operation Operation         
{             
  get             
  {
    RadioButton checkedButton = gbxOperation.Controls.OfType<RadioButton>().
                                             Where(button => button.Checked).First();
    return (Operation)(checkedButton.Tag);
  }
}   
share|improve this answer
    
thanks....it was helpful –  Sandy Feb 14 '12 at 20:53

I would go for the easy combination of adding string .Tag to the RadioButton controls with the names from the Enum and parsing that string on the event when the buttons change:

public Operation Operation { get; private set; }

private void rb_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var rb = sender as RadioButton;
    if (rb.Checked)
    {
        this.Operation = (Operation)Enum.Parse(typeof(Operation), rb.Tag as string);
        ...
    }
}

Set Tag Propery

Set Event Handler

share|improve this answer
    
Why wouldn't you put the enum directly into the Tag? –  svick Feb 14 '12 at 20:57
    
@svick - Tried it and the VS Designer complained when I altered the .Designer.cs file. It liked it better when Tag was assigned to a string. I could override the OnLoad() and set it there of course, but for simplicity this works best. –  ja72 Feb 14 '12 at 21:02
    
You cannot add enums to the Tag property directly via the designer and you should avoid editing the autogenerated InitializeComponent method. I posted an answer earlier to this question with two samples. In it, one sample demonstrates how you can assign the Tag properties in the constructor. I prefer doing it in the constructor, because it is easier to maintain than trying to search through the InitializeComponent. –  base2 Feb 14 '12 at 21:39

I assume you are using Windows Forms. In the sample below, I have two methods out of many that you can use:

  1. Either use the Tag property, which is for custom user data. You can then cast the Tag value to your enumeration for the radio button that was checked.

  2. OR, just create a dictionary between the radio button and the enumeration. You can use the radiobutton as your key and the Operation enum as you value.

Regards.

public class MyForm : Form
{
    public MyForm()
    {
        InitializeComponent();


        // Method 1) The Tag property on any control can be user as user data
        radioButton1.Tag = Operation.Add;
        radioButton2.Tag = Operation.Subtract;
        radioButton3.Tag = Operation.Multiply;
        radioButton4.Tag = Operation.Divide;

        // Method 2) Use a Dictionary
        radioButtonToOperation = new Dictionary<RadioButton, Operation> 
            {
                { radioButton1, Operation.Add },
                { radioButton2, Operation.Subtract },
                { radioButton3, Operation.Multiply },
                { radioButton4, Operation.Divide },
            };
    }

    // Fields
    GroupBox groupBox1;
    RadioButton radioButton1;
    RadioButton radioButton2;
    RadioButton radioButton3;
    RadioButton radioButton4;
    Dictionary<RadioButton, Operation> radioButtonToOperation;

    private void InitializeComponent()
    {   
        groupBox1 = new GroupBox();
        radioButton1 = new RadioButton();
        radioButton2 = new RadioButton();
        radioButton3 = new RadioButton();
        radioButton4 = new RadioButton();

        groupBox1.Text = "Operations";
        groupBox1.Dock = DockStyle.Fill;

        radioButton1.Text = "Add";
        radioButton1.Dock = DockStyle.Top;
        radioButton1.CheckedChanged += radioButtons_CheckedChanged;

        radioButton2.Text = "Subtract";
        radioButton2.Dock = DockStyle.Top;
        radioButton2.CheckedChanged += radioButtons_CheckedChanged;

        radioButton3.Text = "Multiply";
        radioButton3.Dock = DockStyle.Top;
        radioButton3.CheckedChanged += radioButtons_CheckedChanged;

        radioButton4.Text = "Divide";
        radioButton4.Dock = DockStyle.Top;
        radioButton4.CheckedChanged += radioButtons_CheckedChanged;

        groupBox1.Controls.Add(radioButton4);
        groupBox1.Controls.Add(radioButton3);
        groupBox1.Controls.Add(radioButton2);
        groupBox1.Controls.Add(radioButton1);
        Controls.Add(groupBox1);
    }

    void radioButtons_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        RadioButton radioButton = sender as RadioButton;
        if (radioButton == null) return;  // Not a radio button
        if (!radioButton.Checked) return; // Radio button isn't checked

        // Method 1) Get the Operation from the Tag property
        Operation? operationFromTag = GetOperationFromTag(radioButton);
        Console.WriteLine("From Tag: " + (operationFromTag == null ? "(none)" : operationFromTag.ToString() ));

        // OR Method 2) Get the Operation from the Dictionary
        Operation? operationFromDictionary = GetOperationUsingDictionary(radioButton);
        Console.WriteLine("From Dictionary: " + (operationFromDictionary == null ? "(none)" : operationFromDictionary.ToString()) );
    }

    private Operation? GetOperationFromTag(RadioButton radioButton)
    {
        if (radioButton == null) return null;

        if (radioButton.Tag is Operation)
        {
            Operation operationFromTag = (Operation)radioButton.Tag;
            return operationFromTag;
        }

        return null;
    }


    private Operation? GetOperationUsingDictionary(RadioButton radioButton)
    {
        if (radioButton == null) return null;

        Operation operationFromDictionary;
        return
            radioButtonToOperation.TryGetValue(radioButton, out operationFromDictionary)
            ? operationFromDictionary
            : (Operation?)null;
    }

    public Operation? SelectedOperation
    {
        get
        {
            // You must include System.Linq in your using block at the top of the file for the following
            // extension methods to be picked up by the compiler:
            // * Enumerable.OfType<T> is an extension method on IEnumerable. 
            // * Enumerable.SingleOrDefault<T> is an extension method on IEnumerable<T>

            RadioButton selectedRadioButton = 
                groupBox1.Controls                                                      // Go through each of the groupbox child controls
                    .OfType<RadioButton>()                                          // Need to convert Controls, which is IEnumerable, to IEnumerable<Control>
                    .Where(radioButton => radioButton.Checked)  // Filter through only the checked radio buttons
                    .SingleOrDefault();                         // Get the single result, or none. (Exception if there are more than one result)

            return GetOperationUsingDictionary(selectedRadioButton);
        }
    }       
}

public enum Operation
{
        Add = 1,
        Subtract = 2,
        Multiply = 3,
        Divide = 4
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 Too long and convoluted. Do you really need nullable types and helper functions? –  ja72 Feb 14 '12 at 21:36
    
Initially, no radio buttons are selected, so the nullable types are useful to indicate a "no selected value". Yes the sample is a bit long, but it does make it easy to copy and paste for one's own testing purposes. As for helper functions, it makes code reusable, readable and more maintainable, because you don't clutter a single method with too many non-specific functionalities. The explanation in the first paragraph though is short and pretty straight forward. –  base2 Feb 14 '12 at 21:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.