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I have two tables with similar key fields:

TABLE_A (KEY1, KEY2, KEY3, KEY4, A, B, C ...)
TABLE_B (KEY1, KEY2, KEY3, KEY4, A, B, C ...)

I want to delete records from TABLE_B where the set of keys are not present in TABLE_A. So, something like:

DELETE FROM TABLE_B 
WHERE (KEY1, KEY2, KEY3, KEY4) 
NOT IN ( SELECT KEY1, KEY2, KEY3, KEY4 FROM TABLE_A )

What is the best way to do this? Would it be with some type of join? I have a basic understanding of SQL, but it starts to get fuzzy when it comes to these types of functions.

Thanks!

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2  
"and this is clearly invalid sql" -- no, actually it is accepted in exactly the way you have written it by some databases. It would help if you could add information about what database you are using. –  hvd Feb 14 '12 at 20:26
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
DELETE b FROM TABLE_B b
LEFT JOIN TABLE_A a ON a.KEY1=b.KEY1 AND a.KEY2=b.KEY2...
WHERE a.SOMEID IS NULL
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You're deleting the wrong records from the wrong table. The question asks for records from TABLE_B that do not exist in TABLE_A. You're deleting records from TABLE_A that do exist in TABLE_B. –  hvd Feb 14 '12 at 20:28
    
No, don't think I am. The LEFT JOIN is selecting all rows and the where is filtering out the rows that don't exist in A. –  Stefan Mai Feb 14 '12 at 20:30
    
@hvd - no, this is right. The WHERE _ IS NULL is called an exclusion join, and will do exactly what the OP needs. –  Joel Coehoorn Feb 14 '12 at 20:31
    
@StefanMai You edited the answer so that it would be correct, which is fine, but I commented on the original answer. –  hvd Feb 14 '12 at 20:33
    
@JoelCoehoorn The original answer, which I commented on, had DELETE a FROM ... INNER JOIN ... –  hvd Feb 14 '12 at 20:33
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A sub-select will do the trick

DELETE FROM
   TABLE_B B
WHERE
   NOT EXISTS (SELECT *
               FROM TABLE_A A
               WHERE
                    A.KEY1 = B.KEY1 AND
                    A.KEY2 = B.KEY2 AND
                    A.KEY3 = B.KEY3 AND
                    A.KEY4 = B.KEY4
               );
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Your SQL is valid standard SQL:1992 syntax and a good approach.

Of course, the syntax is not supported by all SQL products e.g. mySQL and PostgreSQL support it, SQL Server does not (click on those links for details).

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