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$arr = array(
  'a'          => 1,
  'b'          => 15,
  'c'          => 0,
);

$arr['c'] = &$arr;

print_r($arr); // <-- CYCLE

Do you know how can I detect if I have array values that somehow point to the existing element, or cause a infinite loop?

share|improve this question
1  
As you're iterating the array, you keep track of where you've been - basically checking if you're stepping in your own footprints while going in circle in the woods. –  Marc B Feb 14 '12 at 21:49
    
if( !in_Array( $current, $visited)){ $visited[] = &$current ; goDeeper()} doesn't work? –  Vyktor Feb 14 '12 at 22:00
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use memory, Luke. When your iterator comes across the array as an elementof another one, just store reference/id of it to smth like set or list (or another suitable container, eg. array). So you memorize what array you have already processed, and then ignore it when meet next time or stop the loop.

<?php
function get_id(&$array) {
  return crc32(serialize($array)); 
}

# This will not work as expected. I leave it here just for future versions.
function get_id_alt(&$array) {
  $obj = (object) $array;
  return spl_object_hash($obj);
}

function iterate(array $input, &$reached=array(), $id_func='get_id') {
  // this is an unseen array, memorize it
  array_push($reached, $id_func($input));

  foreach($input as $key=>$item) {
    if (is_array($item)) {        // This is an array
      if (in_array($id_func($item), $reached)) {
        // We found an array that have been processed before. What will you do?
      } else {
        // Recurse!
        iterate($item, $reached);
      }
    } else {
      // It is not traversable value, do what you want here
    }
  }
}

PS: I'm using spl_object_hash as a ID-function, you may use another one, if prefered (but i don't know others that can identify the same objects, as this one does).

UPD: Using spl_object_hash doesn't give right results as of PHP 5.3.10: it treats any array as the same object regardless of its content. But using smth like %hash_fn%(serialize($array)) works well (beware of performance degradation!).

share|improve this answer
    
it says: Warning: spl_object_hash() expects parameter 1 to be object, array given in.. –  thelolcat Feb 14 '12 at 22:13
    
maybe serialize would work? –  thelolcat Feb 14 '12 at 22:17
    
ok, just cast it to the object). That works. –  Andrew D. Feb 14 '12 at 22:18
1  
ok I found out the issue. You have to instantiate a new variable lol, like $object_version = (object)$input; and pass that variable to spl_object_hash. It appears that the spl thingie doesn't compare object properties, just some internal variable IDs and stuff... I thought that casting stuff internally creates a variable, but it appears it doesn't... –  thelolcat Feb 14 '12 at 22:55
1  
meh it doesn't work for the 2nd array and so on :) –  thelolcat Feb 14 '12 at 23:48

(I just posted this as an answer to the Is there a way to detect circular arrays in pure PHP? question that @Cheery mentioned, but I may be updating that answer depending on that asker's needs.)

The isRecursiveArray(array) method below detects circular/recursive arrays. It keeps track of which arrays have been visited by temporarily adding an element containing a known object reference to the end of the array.

function removeLastElementIfSame(array & $array, $reference) {
    if(end($array) === $reference) {
        unset($array[key($array)]);
    }
}

function isRecursiveArrayIteration(array & $array, $reference) {
    $last_element   = end($array);
    if($reference === $last_element) {
        return true;
    }
    $array[]    = $reference;

    foreach($array as &$element) {
        if(is_array($element)) {
            if(isRecursiveArrayIteration($element, $reference)) {
                removeLastElementIfSame($array, $reference);
                return true;
            }
        }
    }

    removeLastElementIfSame($array, $reference);

    return false;
}

function isRecursiveArray(array $array) {
    $some_reference = new stdclass();
    return isRecursiveArrayIteration($array, $some_reference);
}



$array      = array('a','b','c');
var_dump(isRecursiveArray($array));
print_r($array);



$array      = array('a','b','c');
$array[]    = $array;
var_dump(isRecursiveArray($array));
print_r($array);



$array      = array('a','b','c');
$array[]    = &$array;
var_dump(isRecursiveArray($array));
print_r($array);



$array      = array('a','b','c');
$array[]    = &$array;
$array      = array($array);
var_dump(isRecursiveArray($array));
print_r($array);
share|improve this answer

If print_r tells you of recursions, why don't use it? :)

// Set up bad array
$arr = array(
  'a'          => 1,
  'b'          => 15,
  'c'          => 0,
);
$arr['c'] = &$arr;

// Check print_r
if(strpos(print_r($a,1),'*RECURSION*') !== false) {
  echo "Houston, we got a problem!\n";
}

Edit: As outlined by @Vyktor, this does not work in all cases and may produce false positves, but serialize() also gives an indicator for recursion. It gives R for recursion. So we check, if there is an R outside of any string in the output of serialize():

<?php
// Set up bad array
$arr = array(
  'a'          => 1,
  'b'          => 15,
  'c'          => 0,
);
$arr['c'] = &$arr;

$str = serialize($arr);   // Serialize it
$len = strlen($str);      // Get the length

// Simple serialize "parser"
$state = 0;
$recursion_found = false;
for($i=0;$i<$len;$i++) {
  $byte = $str[$i];
  if($byte == "\"" && $state == 0) {
    $state = 1; // in string!
  } else if($byte == "\"" && $state == 1) {
    // Check if the " is escaped
    if($str[$i-1] != "\\") {
      $state = 0; // not in string
    }
  } else if($byte == "R" && $state == 0) { // any R that is not in a string
    $recursion_found = true;
  }
}

if($recursion_found) {
  echo "There is recursion!\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't answer his question + "We should prevent using *RECURSION* when building functions" –  Vyktor Feb 14 '12 at 22:17
    
He could parse the output of print_r :) –  iblue Feb 14 '12 at 22:18
    
array( "We should prevent using *RECURSION* when building functions") you'd mark this as array containing recursion –  Vyktor Feb 14 '12 at 22:19
    
Yep, I know. But not, if he'd write a print_r parser. –  iblue Feb 14 '12 at 22:22
    
looks kind of hacky.. –  thelolcat Feb 14 '12 at 22:26

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