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For some of my winforms applications I need to create a whole bunch of GDI+ objects (brushes, pens, fonts, etc) and use them over and over again. I created a ghetto caching singleton to accomplish what I need, but the code smell is overwhelming...

public sealed class GraphicsPalette
{
    public static readonly GraphicsPalette Instance = new GraphicsPalette();

    static GraphicsPalette()
    {
    }

    private Dictionary<Color, Brush> solidBrushes;

    //multithreading
    private object brushLock;

    private GraphicsPalette()
    {
        solidBrushes = new Dictionary<Color, Brush>();

        brushLock = new object();
    }

    public Brush GetSolidBrush(Color color, int alpha)
    {
        return GetSolidBrush(Color.FromArgb(alpha, color));
    }

    public Brush GetSolidBrush(Color color)
    {
        if (!solidBrushes.ContainsKey(color))
        {
            lock (brushLock)
            {
                if (!solidBrushes.ContainsKey(color))
                {
                    Brush brush = new SolidBrush(color);
                    solidBrushes.Add(color, brush);
                    return brush;
                }
            }
        }
        return solidBrushes[color];
    }
}
  1. Is there a better way for me to reuse these GDI+ objects, as opposed to instantiating them all over again every time OnPaint() etc gets called?
  2. Will the GDI+ objects cause an unmanaged memory leak once the program terminates, or will the finalizer for each Brush object get called which will in turn release any unmanaged resources?

I apologize if this is a repeat, but I didn't find any similar questions.

share|improve this question
    
You can easily test any performance gains by tweaking your singleton. Add a flag to toggle it between a singleton and a..."multi-ton" (I made that word up). The multi-ton will ALWAYS delete and recreate the resource. Then report back here. –  Steve Wellens Feb 14 '12 at 23:10
    
possible duplicate of What is better approach to dispose Brush in User Control –  Hans Passant Feb 15 '12 at 0:13
    
Not really. What I'm trying to find out is, if I hang on to a bunch of GDI+ objects (Brushes) and do not explicitly call Dispose() on them, do I have a guarantee that they will all be properly finalized and disposed automatically when my application domain terminates? If that's not the case, then I'm looking at an unmanaged memory leak. –  Repo Man Feb 15 '12 at 15:26
1  
The dispose pattern implemented and suggested by Microsoft is the one that requires you to implement a Dispose(bool) method that is called from the Dispose() method passing false as a parameter, and from the finalizer, passing true as a parameter. So I think you're safe regarding the memory leak. But I would take extra caution with creating too many temporary resources as it might cause a memory stress (they would get disposed sometime, but there is no guarantee the GC will get to them on time...) –  Itai Bar-Haim Feb 17 '12 at 16:09
2  
If you're constantly using the resources, feel free to not dispose them. If you're using them only once in a while, create/dispose them right away (usually the recommendation). It's all managed, so the framework takes care that everything is disposed at the end of the applications life cycle. You should mostly be worried about memory leaks while the application is running. –  Markus Feb 18 '12 at 15:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There will not be memory leak but it’s better to release GDI+ objects when it makes sense for you. There are a limited amount of them in the operating system, so you might cause rendering issues in your and others applications. Another thing to be mentioned is inability of GDI+ objects (fonts, etc.) to be used by 2+ threads the same time (some difficult to reproduce exceptions might be thrown). You might be interested in some measurements of actual GDI+ objects creation time vs. possible exclusive locking delays. "premature optimization is the root of all evil" © Donald Knuth

Actually it works for me to do some GDI+ objects caching: per painting cycle. Client code might look like this:

class Visual 
{
    public void Draw() 
    {
        using (new GraphicsPalette()) {
            DrawHeader();
            DrawFooter();
        }
    }

    private void DrawHeader() {
        var brush = GraphicsPalette.GetSolidBrush(Color.Green);
        ...   
    }

    public void DrawFooter() { 
        using (new GraphicsPalette()) { // ensures palette existence; does nothing if there is a palette on the stack
            var brush = GraphicsPalette.GetSolidBrush(Color.Green); // returns the same brush as in DrawHeader
            ...
        }
    }
}

So we need GraphicsPalette to ignore nested construction and return the same brush for a given thread. The suggested solution:

public class GraphicsPalette : IDisposable 
{
    [ThreadStatic]
    private static GraphicsPalette _current = null;
    private readonly Dictionary<Color, SolidBrush> _solidBrushes = new Dictionary<Color, SolidBrush>();

    public GraphicsPalette() 
    {
        if (_current == null)
            _current = this;
    }

    public void Dispose() 
    {
        if (_current == this)
            _current = null;

        foreach (var solidBrush in _solidBrushes.Values)
            solidBrush.Dispose();            
    }

    public static SolidBrush GetSolidBrush(Color color) 
    {
        if (!_current._solidBrushes.ContainsKey(color))
            _current._solidBrushes[color] = new SolidBrush(color);

        return _current._solidBrushes[color];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. I actually considered caching the GDI objects inside the winforms control rather than a singleton. That way, I can hook into the control's dispose method and get rid of the objects when the control is no longer needed or a particular form is closing down. –  Repo Man Feb 21 '12 at 19:36

Based on my experience with VG.net, I do not believe caching GDI+ objects is usually worth the trouble, except for large things like Bitmaps. Of course it is easy to measure.

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