Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Inside an initialization method, I have the following code

- (id)init {

    self = [super init];

    if (self) {

        UIButton *tempButton = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeRoundedRect];
        tempButton.frame = CGRectMake(0,0,300,44);

        // some custom code...

        self.myButton = tempButton;
    }

    return self;
}

Where myButton is a retained property. I know that, for what concerns memory management rules, this method equals this other:

- (id)init {

    self = [super init];

    if (self) {

        UIButton *tempButton = [[UIButton alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0,0,300,44)];

        // some custom code...

        self.myButton = tempButton;
        [tempButton release];
    }

    return self;
}

But in this case I need to use the first "version" because the buttonType property is readonly and I cannot change it after having the button initalized.

Since I find myself using the "non init-release" version in multiple methods all over my application, and for several object (most of them are NSString), my question is: not counting in this case the assignment to the property which retains the object, when the tempButton object will be released? Maybe at the end of the method/if statement? Or will the first "version" lead to an increased memory usage, since the object is not being released right away but after a certain amount of time?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you're a bit confused here: in both of your snippets, you create a tempButton object, but then you're assigning it to self.myButton. At that point, both tempButton and self.myButton are pointers to the same object. Now, presumably the myButton @property you're using is a strong property, so by assigning tempButton to it, you increase its retain count, and therefore in either version of the code it would have a retain count of +1 at the end, and would not be dealloc'ed.

If, hypothetically, myButton wasn't a strong property, then there would be an error in your code, and in both cases tempButton would be prematurely released and dealloc'ed. Here's what would happen in the two cases:

In your first version, since you're getting tempButton comes from something other than an init or copy method, it gets a retain count of +1, but is autoreleased. At the end of the current iteration of the run loop, the autorelease would kick in, bringing its retain count to 0 and causing it to be dealloc'ed.

In the second version, you first get a tempButton with a retain count of 1 because it's coming from an init method. But later on you explicitly release it, bringing its retain count to 0, at which point it is immediately dealloc'ed.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh well, I was missing the run loop part. Is it possible for you to be more precise about the "current iteration of the run loop"? Is that iteration associated with the single method or something longer, maybe a fixed amount of time? May it be the entire application lifetime? I tried to understand more by reading tutorial, but no one really explains this explicitly. –  Andrea Sprega Feb 15 '12 at 0:19
    
"Current iteration of the run loop" is actually about as precise as I could possibly be. The run loop is the event processing loop in Cocoa. Here's a good blog post if you want to know more: blog.shinetech.com/2009/06/02/run-loops-vs-threads-in-cocoa –  yuji Feb 15 '12 at 0:26

the non-init method is exactly the same as:

UIButton *tempButton = [[[UIButton alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0,0,300,44)] autorelease];

so the idea is to understand more about how the auto release pool works, its very useful most of the time but u need to understand how it works incase u will use the object later on in the app. and to note something, when u add the temp button to ur view that view will retain it, and will release it when its removed from it, u can use instruments and check the retain count of the object if u wish to view how release/retain is going on if u want to see it in action.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.