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I'm trying to find out how to return the output parameter of a stored procedure when executing the stored procedure inside another stored procedure:

 CREATE PROCEDURE Test1

 EXEC SpWithOutputID -- Outputs @ID

 SELECT @ID as ID -- Output @ID now being used in this SP

This is of course not my code, but just an example, is it possible to do this?

Example 2: --Here @ID returns Null

 CREATE PROCEDURE Test1
 As 
 DECLARE @ID int

 EXEC SpWithOutputID @ID = @ID OUTPUT -- Outputs @ID

 SELECT @ID as ID -- Output @ID now being used in this SP

Example 3: --Here @ID returns an Int

 CREATE PROCEDURE Test1
 As 

 EXEC SpWithOutputID -- Outputs @ID
share|improve this question
    
You'll need to clarify... is @ID in SpWithOutputID an actual OUTPUT parameter, or is it selected like the last line? Big difference, and terminology is important. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 15 '12 at 0:59
    
the sp there has no OUTPUT param, but it still Outputs a value, so i guess i have to give SpWithOutputID an Output Param, I get it. Thanks again Aaron, what would i do without you..? =] –  Zee Tee Feb 15 '12 at 1:01
    
You'll need to show the code that you expect to run inside SpWithOutputID. You should also clarify the question, because you have a different definition of output param from most of your readers. If you need to return a single scalar value back, then you should make the inner SP return an OUTPUT param, not a result set. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 15 '12 at 1:04
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If this isn't really an output parameter issue at all, but rather a result set, then taking a guess that SpWithOutputID does something like this (returns a SELECT with a single row and single column):

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.SpWithOutputID
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    SELECT ID = 4;
END
GO

Then Test1 could look like this:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.Test1
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    DECLARE @ID INT;

    CREATE TABLE #x(ID INT);

    INSERT #x EXEC dbo.SpWithOutputID;

    SELECT TOP (1) @ID = ID FROM #x;

    DROP TABLE #x;
END
GO


But doesn't that look really messy to you? It really should work this way for single, scalar values:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.SpWithOutputID
    @ID INT OUTPUT 
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    SELECT @ID = 4; 
END 
GO

Now it is much simpler to consume what is really an output parameter now:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.Test1
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    DECLARE @ID INT;

    EXEC dbo.SpWithOutputID @ID = @ID OUTPUT;

    SELECT @ID;
END
GO
share|improve this answer
    
In dbo.Test1, don't you have to Declare @ID ? Does it actually work, because i'm getting a NULL value over here. –  Zee Tee Feb 15 '12 at 1:12
    
Sorry, corrected. I grabbed that from the previous example when you led me to believe you were using an output parameter... –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 15 '12 at 1:13
    
Yes, it works. yfrog.com/kja44p Why would you accept the answer and then ask if it works? –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 15 '12 at 1:15
    
Ok it's like that, but @ID is returning a NULL in Test1, but when i run it SpWithOutputID without any param, i get the right @ID returned. Hmmm... –  Zee Tee Feb 15 '12 at 1:17
    
I don't understand, sorry. What is different about your query than what I showed in the screen shot? Your description sounds the opposite to me. If you run SpWithOutputID without any parameters, then there is no way you get any value in @ID in dbo.Test1. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 15 '12 at 1:18
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