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I know the question is pretty subjective, but I'm sure I'm not following standards on this one - as while styles and approaches may differ to development, there are some pretty solid standards.

Anyway, when defining a function in javascript that uses the jQuery library, I usually do the following;

function funcName() {
    $(document).ready(function() {
         // Do stuff
    });
}

Attempting to do this in order to use jQuery inside of a function hasn't worked for me, hence why I'm using the above;

$(document).ready(function() {
     function funcName() {
         // Do stuff
     }
});

Any comments/answers on the standards compliant/common way to use jQuery within a function would be very much appreciated!

Edit: A remarkable level of stupidity caused me to ask this question. Since I started using jQuery (before I really even understood anything about development), I'd always encased my code in $(document).ready(function{}), not thinking about it's actual purpose.

If you want to vote to close this, please do.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Avicinnian, Sparky, Code Magician, Toto, Ryley Mar 13 '14 at 15:29

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
"Attempting to do this ... hasn't worked for me" Maybe you should ask about the code that isn't working with the second example. Are you using inline handlers that call funcName? – squint Feb 15 '12 at 1:03
    
$(document).ready() is actually a function that executes upon the page loading so these two approaches yield different results. What are you trying to achieve? Be more specific. – Shomz Feb 15 '12 at 1:04
    
Unless you're trying to do something tricky, I would never suggest placing the $(document).ready(function(){}) (or $(function(){}) for short) function within another wrapper function. As Shomz said, the $(document).ready() function is called automatically when the page has finished loading, so it needs no wrapper. Then, have the ready function call any procedures you need executed. – Kris Schouw Feb 15 '12 at 1:19
    
To define a function which can use the jQuery library within it. I think perhaps I've gone completely off base and made I really, really, really stupid mistake. Having used $(document).ready() for so long without actually thinking what it does, and now realizing that it actually just binds an event which fires when the page is ready, but is not needed in and of itself to execute jQuery, would simply `function funcName { // Any jQuery } work? I can't believe I didn't try that. – Avicinnian Feb 15 '12 at 1:21
    
Edit: Clearly, that would be the case. I apologize for taking up peoples time on a remarkably stupid question :). – Avicinnian Feb 15 '12 at 1:24

The problem is that when you call

$(document).ready(function(){
 myFunc();
});

myFunc will be called once the document ready event has fired (when the page is ready).

But if you put that block into a function, it will be called whenever you call the wrapping function and that might be too late to listen to the document.ready event.

ie.

function doSomething()
{
    $(document).ready(function(){
        myFunc();
    });
}

When you call doSomething() it will then Bind myFunc() to the page ready event. But if you call that after the page.ready event has fired (your page has loaded), like if you call it when the user clicks something, then myFunc() will never happen.

The first implementation is usually the best, generally you don't want to bind your functions to events right away, and then respond to them.

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If for some reason you need to define your function on DOM load, then you can assign the function to an in-scope variable (in this case, window.myFunc).

$(document).ready(function() {
    window.myFunc = function(){
        alert('myFunc');
    }
});

Since there's only one instance of window per browser window, you can access it as follows from anywhere. Just be careful not to overwrite any of window's inherent methods.

window.myFunc();

There is also some good information on function scope here and here.

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(function($){/do smth/})(jQuery);

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