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I have written the following code, can you explain me what does the assembly tell here.

typedef struct
{
    int abcd[5];
} hh;

void main()
{
    printf("%d", ((hh*)0)+1);
}  

Assembly:

        .file   "aa.c"
        .section        ".rodata"
        .align 8
.LLC0:

        .asciz  "%d\n"
        .section        ".text"
        .align 4
        .global main
        .type   main, #function
        .proc   020
main:

        save    %sp, -112, %sp
        sethi   %hi(.LLC0), %g1
        or      %g1, %lo(.LLC0), %o0
        mov     20, %o1
        call    printf, 0
         nop
        return  %i7+8
         nop
        .size   main, .-main
        .ident  "GCC: (GNU) 4.2.1"
share|improve this question
    
What CPU is this? –  duskwuff Feb 15 '12 at 5:00
2  
SPARC. The save instruction and the registers named %gN, %oN and %iN are a dead giveaway. –  Zack Feb 15 '12 at 5:10
2  
Since you're using gcc, you might want to try compiling with the flags -g -Wa,-aldh which will print a listing that interleaves the high-level source code with the generated assembly. –  John Bode Feb 15 '12 at 11:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Oh wow, SPARC assembly language, I haven't seen that in years.

I guess we go line by line? I'm going to skip some of the uninteresting boilerplate.

        .section        ".rodata"
        .align 8
.LLC0:
        .asciz  "%d\n"

This is the string constant you used in printf (so obvious, I know!) The important things to notice are that it's in the .rodata section (sections are divisions of the eventual executable image; this one is for "read-only data" and will in fact be immutable at runtime) and that it's been given the label .LLC0. Labels that begin with a dot are private to the object file. Later, the compiler will refer to that label when it wants to load the address of the string constant.

        .section        ".text"
        .align 4
        .global main
        .type   main, #function
        .proc   020
main:

.text is the section for actual machine code. This is the boilerplate header for defining the global function named main, which at the assembly level is no different from any other function (in C -- not necessarily so in C++). I don't remember what .proc 020 does.

        save    %sp, -112, %sp

Save the previous register window and adjust the stack pointer downward. If you don't know what a register window is, you need to read the architecture manual: http://www.sparc.org/standards/V8.pdf. (V8 is the last 32-bit iteration of SPARC, V9 is the first 64-bit one. This appears to be 32-bit code.)

        sethi   %hi(.LLC0), %g1
        or      %g1, %lo(.LLC0), %o0

This two-instruction sequence has the net effect of loading the address .LLC0 (that's your string constant) into register %o0, which is the first outgoing argument register. (The arguments to this function are in the incoming argument registers.)

        mov     100, %o1

Load the immediate constant 100 into %o1, the second outgoing argument register. This is the value computed by ((foo *)0)+5. It's 100 because your struct foo is 20 bytes long (five 4-byte ints) and you asked for the fifth one after address zero.

        call    printf, 0
        nop

Call printf. The nop fills in a delay slot (again, read the architecture manual). I don't remember what the zero is for.

        return  %i7+8
        nop

Jump to the address in register %i7 plus eight. This has the effect of returning from the current function. There should be a restore instruction in the delay slot, I don't know why it isn't there.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 ... beat me to the punch :) ... I'll delete my answer ... –  Jason Feb 15 '12 at 5:12
    
@Zack: main() is special in that its caller doesn't have any expectations on preserved state - that includes the register window. main()'s caller will always only exit afterwards (just dis the resulting executable and look for __start) Hence, no restore required in this specific case. There's probably a mention of this in the SPARC ABI somewhere ... –  FrankH. Feb 15 '12 at 10:57
    
@FrankH. Usually the last line of _start is exit(main(argc, argv, environ)) or the equivalent in assembly. Doesn't it need to pop the register window in order for the argument to exit to wind up in the right place? (This may be a silly question, it has been a very long time since I touched a SPARC box.) –  Zack Feb 15 '12 at 16:12
    
@Zack: Notice the erroneous declaration void main() - does that answer the question ? –  FrankH. Feb 15 '12 at 16:27
    
Ha, yes, yes it does :) –  Zack Feb 15 '12 at 16:52

The assembly calls printf, passing your text buffer and the number 20 on the stack (which is what you asked for in a roundabout way).

share|improve this answer
    
It passes 100, not 20 –  Zack Feb 15 '12 at 5:09
    
@Zack: looks like the code was edited. –  Michael Burr Feb 15 '12 at 5:14
    
I get 20 from this: mov 20, %o1 –  StilesCrisis Feb 15 '12 at 5:16
1  
... yeah, that's not what it used to say. Sorry for the noise. +1 for the much shorter answer :) –  Zack Feb 15 '12 at 5:19

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