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A colleague of mine recently stated it is fine for multiple read write threads to access a c# dictionary if you don't mind retreiving stale data. His justification was that since the program would reapeatedly read from the dictionary, stale data won't be an issue.

I told him that locking a collection was always necessary when you have a writer thread because the internal state of the collection will get corrupted.

Am I mistaken?

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He says that an exception will be thrown whenever the collection detects an invalid concurrent access. He can then catch the exception and retry again. He says he wants to minimize locking to improve the performance. Is it possible to just catch the exception and retry again? –  Koda Feb 15 '12 at 8:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are correct, and your colleague is wrong: one can access a dictionary from multiple threads only in the absence of writers.

.NET 4.0 adds ConcurrentDictionary<K,T> class that does precisely what its name implies.

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+1 for ConcurrentDictionary, though it's no substitute for actually knowing what's going on. The concurrent collections provide functions that provide many common multi-step processes into a single process that manages locking, but they're not one-size-fits-all substitutions. –  Adam Robinson Feb 15 '12 at 5:01
    
@AdamRobinson Your comment about one-size-fits-all is spot-on: there is no substitute to knowing what is going on. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 15 '12 at 5:09
    
He says that an exception will be thrown whenever the collection detects an invalid concurrent access. He can then catch the exception and retry again. He says he wants to minimize locking to improve the performance. Is it possible to just catch the exception and retry again? –  Koda Feb 15 '12 at 5:55
    
@Alvin Nope, this is not going to work either: the problem is that the collection does not always detect concurrent modifications. Other than tripping over an occasional index out of range exception, TryGetValue and [] do not do any concurrency checking. They will occasionally return you values for wrong keys instead of throwing an exception, so you wouldn't know to retry. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 15 '12 at 10:07
    
@Alvin Why is he optimizing it, anyway? Did the profiler tell him that locking inside ConcurrentDictionary is the bottleneck in your system, or is it a premature optimization? –  dasblinkenlight Feb 15 '12 at 10:09

You are correct in that some form of locking is required for writing, though just having a write doesn't mean that you have to lock() { } every access to the collection.

As you say, the non-synchronized versions of the built-in collections are thread safe only for reading. Typically a ReadWriterLockSlim is used to manage concurrent access in cases where writes can happen, as it will allow for multiple threads to access the collection as long as no writes are taking place, but only one thread (the writer) during a write.

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From http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xfhwa508.aspx :

A Dictionary can support multiple readers concurrently, as long as the collection is not modified. Even so, enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. In the rare case where an enumeration contends with write accesses, the collection must be locked during the entire enumeration. To allow the collection to be accessed by multiple threads for reading and writing, you must implement your own synchronization.

For a thread-safe alternative, see ConcurrentDictionary<TKey, TValue>.

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