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I have a site with the navbar fixed on top and 3 divs underneath in the main content area.

I'm trying to use scrollspy from the bootstrap framework.

I have it succesfully highlighting the different headings in the menu when you scroll past the divs.

I also have it so when you click the menu, it will scroll to the correct part of the page. However, the offset is incorrect (It's not taking into account the navbar, so I need to offset by about 40 pixels)

I see on the Bootstrap page it mentions an offset option but i'm not sure how to use it.

I'm also not what it means when it says you can use scrollspy with $('#navbar').scrollspy(), I'm not sure where to include it so I didn't and everything seems to be working (except the offset).

I thought the offset might be the data-offset='10' on the body tag, but it doesn't do anything for me.

I have a feeling that this is something really obvious and I'm just missing it. Any help?

My code is

...
<!-- note: the data-offset doesn't do anything for me -->
<body data-spy="scroll" data-offset="20">
<div class="navbar navbar-fixed-top">
<div class="navbar-inner">
    <div class="container">
    <a class="brand" href="#">VIPS</a>
    <ul class="nav">
        <li class="active">
             <a href="#trafficContainer">Traffic</a>
        </li>
        <li class="">
        <a href="#responseContainer">Response Times</a>
        </li>
        <li class="">
        <a href="#cpuContainer">CPU</a>
        </li>
      </ul>
    </div>
</div>
</div>
<div class="container">
<div class="row">
    <div class="span12">
    <div id="trafficContainer" class="graph" style="position: relative;">
    <!-- graph goes here -->
    </div>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="row">
    <div class="span12">
    <div id="responseContainer" class="graph" style="position: relative;">
    <!-- graph goes here -->
    </div>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="row">
    <div class="span12">
    <div id="cpuContainer" class="graph" style="position: relative;">
    <!-- graph goes here -->
    </div>
    </div>
</div>
</div>

...
<script src="assets/js/jquery-1.7.1.min.js"></script>
<script src="assets/js/bootstrap-scrollspy.js"></script>
</body>
</html>
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Why are you giving a position:relative to your divs? Perhaps that's what's causing this. Can you create a jsfiddle with your code so we can see in action? –  periklis Feb 15 '12 at 6:45
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8 Answers

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Bootstrap uses offset to resolve spying only, not scrolling. This means that scrolling to the proper place is up to you.

Try this, it works for me: add an event handler for the navigation clicks.

var offset = 80;

$('.navbar li a').click(function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    $($(this).attr('href'))[0].scrollIntoView();
    scrollBy(0, -offset);
});

I found it here: https://github.com/twitter/bootstrap/issues/3316

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1  
Thanks for the answer. Took me quite a while to realise that offset does not affect scrolling. This means anybody using a fixed-top needs to manually adjust in this manner. –  Brian Smith Aug 6 '12 at 10:49
4  
To update the hash section of the URL appropriately, add window.location.hash = $(this).attr('href') to this function. –  smhmic Oct 30 '12 at 22:01
2  
Thanks! FWIW, putting the data-offset in the body is also important, as the asker says it doesn't do anything, but it is needed for proper spying. It might help to have a comprehensive answer. –  mrooney Mar 28 '13 at 15:38
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The trick, as Tim alluded to, is to take advantage of padding. So the problem is, your browser always wants to scroll your anchor to the exact top of the window. if you set your anchor where your text actually begins, it will be occluded by your menu bar. Instead, what you do is set your anchor to the container <section> or <div> tag's id, which the nav/navbar will automatically use. Then you have to set your padding-top for the container to the amount offset you want, and the margin-top for the container to the opposite of the padding-top. Now your container's block and the anchor begin at the exact top of the page, but the content inside doesn't begin until below the menu bar.

If you're using regular anchors, you can accomplish the same thing by using negative margin-top in your container as above, but no padding. Then you put a regular <a target="..."> anchor as the first child of the container. Then you style the second child element with an opposite but equal margin-top, but using the selector .container:first-child +.

This all presumes that your <body> tag already has its margin set to begin below your header, which is the norm (otherwise the page would render with occluded text right off the bat).

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3  
Love the padding-top, negative margin-bottom (on the same element) combo. Easier then messing around with the js. –  Eystein Oct 11 '12 at 16:40
1  
This is very good answer. Also note to set data-offset. –  ken Nov 26 '12 at 3:31
1  
This is an absolute beauty of a workaround. –  hydrogen Nov 28 '12 at 22:52
    
Looks like the best answer, but I am a little lost. Any chance of an example. –  eddyparkinson Apr 23 at 6:17
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If you want an offset of 10 you would put this in your head:

<script>
  $('#navbar').scrollspy({
    offset: 10
  });
</script>

Your body tag would look like this:

<body data-spy="scroll">
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1  
That doesn't offset the content, it offsets the nav. –  markus Nov 5 '13 at 0:31
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You can change the offset of scrollspy on the fly with this (assuming you spying on the body):

offsetValue = 40;
$('body').data().scrollspy.options.offset = offsetValue;
// force scrollspy to recalculate the offsets to your targets
$('body').data().scrollspy.process();

This also works if you need to change the offset value dynamically. (I like the scrollspy to switch over when the next section is about halfway up the window so I need to change the offset during window resize.)

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1  
Thanks for this - works great with a little adjustment for Bootstrap 3.0 $('body').data()['bs.scrollspy'].options.offset = newOffset; // Set the new offset $('body').data()['bs.scrollspy'].process(); // Force scrollspy to recalculate the offsets to your targets $('body').scrollspy('refresh'); // Refresh the scrollspy. –  Sam Nov 11 '13 at 18:56
    
I've found that this method is good, but that if I want to use it to set the offset from the beginning due to having different menu heights the $('body').data().scrollspy.options.offset (or the variant for version 3.0) isn't yet set. Is there something asynchronous about scrollspy that I'm missing? –  FusePump Dev Jan 27 at 8:28
    
As of Bootstrap 3.1.1 this should be $('body').data()['bs.scrollspy'].options.offset. Useful for triggering scrollspy on page load by using window.scrollBy(X,Y) –  Meredith Jul 4 at 7:59
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I think that offset might do something with the bottom position of the section.

I fixed my issue - the same as yours - by adding

  padding-top: 60px;

in the declaration for section in bootstrap.css

Hope that helps!

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I added 40px-height .vspace element holding the anchor before each of my h1 elements.

<div class="vspace" id="gherkin"></div>
<div class="page-header">
  <h1>Gherkin</h1>
</div>

In the CSS:

.vspace { height: 40px;}

It's working great and the space is not chocking.

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I had problems with the solutions of acjohnson55 and Kurt UXD. Both worked for clicking a link to the hash, but the scrollspy offset was still not correct.

I came up with the following solution:

<div class="anchor-outer">
  <div id="anchor">
    <div class="anchor-inner">
      <!-- your content -->
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

And the corresponding CSS:

body {
  padding-top:40px;
}

.anchor-outer {
  margin-top:-40px;
}

.anchor-inner {
  padding-top:40px;
}

@media (max-width: 979px) {
  body {
    padding-top:0px;
  }

  .anchor-outer {
    margin-top:0px;
  }

  .anchor-inner {
    padding-top:0px;
  }
}

@media (max-width: 767px) {
  body {
    padding-top:0px;
  }

  .anchor-outer {
    margin-top:0px;
  }

  .anchor-inner {
    padding-top:0px;
  }
}

You will need to replace the 40px padding / margin with the height of your navbar, and the id of your anchor.

In this setup I can even observe an effect of setting a value for the data-offset attribute. If find large values for the data-offset around 100-200 lead to a more expected behavior (the scrollspy-"switch" will happen if the heading is circa in the middle of the screen).

I also found that scrollspy is very sensitive to errors like unclosed div tags (which is quite obvious), so http://validator.w3.org/check was my friend here.

In my opinion scrollspy works best with whole sections carrying the anchor ID, since regular anchor elements do not lead to expected effects when scrolling backwards (the scrollspy-"switch" eventually happens as soon as you hit the anchor element, e.g. your heading, but at that time you have already scrolled over the content which the user expects to belong to the according heading).

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You can also open bootstap-offset.js and modify

$.fn.scrollspy.defaults = {
  offset: 10
}

there.

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The scrollspy offset doesn't offset the content, it offsets the nav. –  markus Nov 5 '13 at 0:32
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