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I've got a simple table that is used for an inbox as follows:

<table border="1">
    	<tr>
    		<th>From</th>
    		<th>Subject</th>
    		<th>Date</th>
    	</tr>

How do I set the width so the From and Date are 15% of the page width and the Subject is 70%. I also want the table to take up the whole page width.

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10 Answers 10

<table>
    <colgroup>
       <col span="1" style="width: 15%;">
       <col span="1" style="width: 70%;">
       <col span="1" style="width: 15%;">
    </colgroup>
    <!-- Put <thead>, <tbody>, and <tr>'s here! -->
</table>
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9  
Does it work for HTML5 ? – Zulu Mar 13 '13 at 21:08
7  
@Zulu. Yes, width is specified in CSS style. – Tristan May 30 '13 at 22:51
3  
Like the cleanliness of this solution. However, please close out the col e.g <col span="1" style="width: 15%;" /> or <col span="1" style="width: 15%;"></col> – lsu_guy Aug 25 '13 at 0:22
13  
@Isu_guy you only close <col> when using XHTML -- in HTML, <col> tag has no closing... see link for more info. In HTML5, <col> is a void element, meaning it MUST NOT be closed – Matija Nalis Aug 31 '13 at 14:22
11  
@Caltor: the code is not using the <col> width attribute; it is using a CSS *style* width, which is what replaced the <col> width attribute. (despite the multiple people up-voting that comment!!) – ToolmakerSteve Aug 2 '14 at 19:02

HTML:

<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th class="from">From</th>
      <th class="subject">Subject</th>
      <th class="date">Date</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>[from]</td>
      <td>[subject]</td>
      <td>[date]</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

CSS:

table {
  width: 100%;
  border: 1px solid #000;
}
th.from, th.date {
  width: 15%
}
th.subject {
  width: 70%; /* Not necessary, since only 70% width remains */
}

The best practice is to keep your HTML and CSS separate for less code duplication, and for separation of concerns (HTML for structure and semantics, and CSS for presentation).

Note that, for this to work in older versions of Internet Explorer, you may have to give your table a specific width (e.g., 900px). That browser has some problems rendering an element with percentage dimensions if its wrapper doesn't have exact dimensions.

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14  
Using colgroup is probably better practice if you want to style a whole column. – Muhd Dec 1 '11 at 22:51
1  
+1 for getting the width specification completely out of the HTML and into the CSS. – Seth Aug 26 '12 at 19:16
    
+1 for the good note about old versions of IE; "older versions of Internet Explorer". – Samuel Jul 2 '14 at 15:05
    
this solution fails if you have colspans in the first row – mark1234 Aug 13 '15 at 15:52

Use the CSS below, the first declaration will ensure your table sticks to the widths you provide (you'll need to add the classes in your HTML):

table{
  table-layout:fixed;
}
th.from, th.date {
  width: 15%;
}
th.subject{
  width: 70%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. The "table-layout" bit made the CSS work. – Michael Nguyen Jun 29 '15 at 4:10
    
Actually you only need to specify width of the two columns. The third one will be calculated automatically, so table{table-layout:fixed};.from,.date{width:15%} is enough. Unless the classes are used on other elements too, writing th.from is redundant and can be shortened to just .from. – tomasz86 Apr 26 at 1:44

Alternative way with just one class while keeping your styles in a CSS file, which even works in IE7:

<table class="mytable">
    <tr>
        <th>From</th>
        <th>Subject</th>
        <th>Date</th>
    </tr>
</table>
<style>
    .mytable td, .mytable th { width:15%; }
    .mytable td + td, .mytable th + th { width:70%; }
    .mytable td + td + td, .mytable th + th + th { width:15%; }
</style>

More recently, you can also use the nth-child() selector from CSS3 (IE9+), where you'd just put the nr. of the respective column into the parenthesis instead of stringing them together with the adjacent selector. Like this, for example:

<style>
    .mytable tr > *:nth-child(1) { width:15%; }
    .mytable tr > *:nth-child(2) { width:70%; }
    .mytable tr > *:nth-child(3) { width:15%; }
</style>
share|improve this answer
    
The proposed :nth-child solution is horrible in terms of performance. There is no valid reason to use it (especially with the universal selector) in this example where there are only three elements (th or col) to style. Additionally, you only need to set width to the th in the first row. The .mytable td in the first example is redundant. – tomasz86 Apr 25 at 16:29
    
"The proposed :nth-child solution is horrible in terms of performance." - citation needed. – DanMan Apr 25 at 21:10
    
This should be enough: Efficiently Rendering CSS. With your use of the universal selector the browser will first check ALL elements whether they are nth child of another element, then if their direct parent is tr and then whether they belong to .mytable. If you really want to use "nth" then something like this will probably be much better: .mytable th:nth-of-type(1) {width: 15%}; .mytable th:nth-of-type(2) {width: 70%};. There is also no need to specify the third column width in this case. – tomasz86 Apr 26 at 1:27
    
Personally I would use classes or just .mytable th+th{width: 70%}.mytable th+th+th{width:15%}. The "nth" selectors themselves may be very useful but in this particular case (a tiny table with only 3 columns) are not really needed. When using table-layout: fixed you can even do just this: table{table-layout:fixed}th:first-child+th{width:70%}. – tomasz86 Apr 26 at 2:23
    
I'm aware of that. But those articles are from years back, and there are bigger problems today that CSS selectors, like huge amounts of images and JS code. – DanMan Apr 26 at 19:58

Depending on your body (or the div which is wrapping your table) 'settings' you should be able to do this:

body {
  width: 98%;
}

table {
  width: 100%;
}


th {
  border: 1px solid black;
}


th.From, th.Date {
  width: 15%;
}

th.Date {
  width: 70%;
}


<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th class="From">From</th>
      <th class="Subject">Subject</th>
      <th class="Date">Date</th>
    </tr>
   </thead>
   <tbody>
     <tr>
       <td>Me</td>
       <td>Your question</td>
       <td>5/30/2009 2:41:40 AM UTC</td>
     </tr>
   </tbody>
</table>

Demo

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Don't use the border attribute, use CSS for all your styling needs.

<table style="border:1px; width:100%;">
    <tr>
            <th style="width:15%;">From</th>
            <th style="width:70%;">Subject</th>
            <th style="width:15%;">Date</th>
    </tr>
... rest of the table code...
</table>

But embedding CSS like that is poor practice - one should use CSS classes instead, and put the CSS rules in an external CSS file.

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1  
I would suspect that the example code the OP and helpful stackoverflowians posted was for legibility and simplicity's sake, by no means an encouragement for inline styles. – Tass Jul 20 '11 at 20:58
<table>
  <col width="130">
  <col width="80">
  <tr>
    <th>Month</th>
    <th>Savings</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>January</td>
    <td>$100</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>February</td>
    <td>$80</td>
  </tr>
</table>

Demo

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3  
The col width attribute is not supported in HTML5. – Rune Jul 22 '15 at 10:51

Here's another minimal way to do it in CSS that works even in older browsers that do not support :nth-child and the like selectors: http://jsfiddle.net/3wZWt/.

HTML:

<table>
    <tr>
        <th>From</th>
        <th>Subject</th>
        <th>Date</th>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Dmitriy</td>
        <td>Learning CSS</td>
        <td>7/5/2014</td>
    </tr>
</table>

CSS:

table {
    border-collapse: collapse;
    width: 100%;
}

tr > * {
    border: 1px solid #000;
}

tr > th + th {
    width: 70%;
}

tr > th + th + th {
    width: 15%;
}
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Try this instead.

<table style="width: 100%">
    <tr>
        <th style="width: 20%">
           column 1
        </th>
        <th style="width: 40%">
           column 2
        </th>
        <th style="width: 40%">
           column 3
        </th>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td style="width: 20%">
           value 1
        </td>
        <td style="width: 40%">
           value 2
        </td>
        <td style="width: 40%">
           value 3
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>
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These are my two suggestions.

  1. Using classes. There is no need to specify width of the two other columns as they will be set to 15% each automatically by the browser.

        table { table-layout: fixed; }
        .subject { width: 70%; }
        <table>
          <tr>
            <th>From</th>
            <th class="subject">Subject</th>
            <th>Date</th>
          </tr>
        </table>

  2. Without using classes. Three different methods but the result is identical.

    a)

        table { table-layout: fixed; }
        th+th { width: 70%; }
        th+th+th { width: 15%; }
        <table>
          <tr>
            <th>From</th>
            <th>Subject</th>
            <th>Date</th>
          </tr>
        </table>

    b)

        table { table-layout: fixed; }
        th:nth-of-type(2) { width: 70%; }
        <table>
          <tr>
            <th>From</th>
            <th>Subject</th>
            <th>Date</th>
          </tr>
        </table>

    c) This one is my favourite. Same as b) but with better browser support.

        table { table-layout: fixed; }
        th:first-child+th { width: 70%; }
        <table>
          <tr>
            <th>From</th>
            <th>Subject</th>
            <th>Date</th>
          </tr>
        </table>

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