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I have a table containing 2 entries.

Something like

CREATE TABLE  `db`.`main` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
);

The id for these 2 entries are automatically generated primary keys.

I have another table with a rule linking

CREATE TABLE  `db`.`day` (
    `main_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
    `day` tinyint(4) NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT `fk_db_main` FOREIGN KEY (`main_id`) REFERENCES `main` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION
);

now I can successfully get a result using

SELECT * FROM main where id='9';

but when I try to run

INSERT INTO day (main_id, day) VALUES (9, 0);

I get

"Cannot add or update a child row: a foreign key constraint fails (db.day, CONSTRAINT fk_db_main FOREIGN KEY (main_id) REFERENCES main (id) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION) (1452)"

Any suggestions on what I am missing with the insert?

**I hadn't listed the actual cause of the issue while asking the question. The actual cause was that the main db table was in MyISAM, and the InnoDB tables couldn't create a foreign key connecting to it. In short, MyISAM doesn't support foreign keys, even when they are coming from other tables.

share|improve this question
    
The insert statement looks fine. – Mitch Wheat May 30 '09 at 2:51
    
I'm puzzled that you think there are two 'entries' in the 'main' table. To my way of thinking, there is one column - called ID - and it is also the primary key of the table. – Jonathan Leffler May 30 '09 at 2:58
1  
Also, why do you quote the '9' in the SELECT? And what result do you get when you run the SELECT? – Jonathan Leffler May 30 '09 at 3:00
    
I get back a 9. The quotes don't make any difference, it was just something I happened to be testing when I couldn't figure out the issue. – lief79 May 31 '09 at 15:16
    
No solution yet because I don't understand the problem. (The sql works without the constraint, so I'll do the sanity checking in the software for now. I removed the constraint for the short term, this will let me continue. – lief79 Jun 1 '09 at 15:00

The insert works for me if I remove the db. parts in the CREATE TABLE statements (and insert into main a row with an id of 9). Maybe the problem is that you're using that db. prefix inconsistently, i.e. after TABLE but not in the CONSTRAINT clause...?

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yep, I was going to suggest double-checking which database you're querying. – Bill Karwin May 30 '09 at 5:36
    
Are you saying the creation of a trigger wouldn't cause issues if the data it depended on doesn't exist? I'll have to look into that. – lief79 May 31 '09 at 15:18

The FOREIGN KEY constraint says "there shall be an entry in the 'main` table with an ID value that matches the newly inserted 'main_id' value in the 'day' table".

When you INSERT the value 9 into 'day', is there already a row in 'main' with ID = 9?

The DBMS doesn't think so - that's why it complained.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, selecting the id of value 9 from main where id equals 9 is returning 9. – lief79 May 31 '09 at 15:14
    
OK - then I think Alex Martelli is on the right track. There is some other table called main than just the one called db.main, and your foreign key is not referencing the table you think it is. – Jonathan Leffler May 31 '09 at 19:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I hadn't listed the actual cause of the issue while asking the question. The actual cause was that the main db table was in MyISAM, and the InnoDB tables couldn't create a foreign key connecting to it. In short, MyISAM doesn't support foreign keys, even when they are coming from other tables.

share|improve this answer

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