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For kicks I'm writing a "schema documentation" tool that generates a description of the tables and relationships in a database. I'm currently shimming it to work with SQLite.

I've managed to extract the names of all the tables in a SQLite database via a query on the sqlite_master table. For each table name, I then fire off a simple

select * from <table name>

query, then use the sqlite3_column_count() and sqlite3_column_name() APIs to collect the column names, which I further feed to sqlite3_table_column_metadata() to get additional info. Simple enough, right?

The problem is that it only works for tables that are not empty. That is, the sqlite_column_*() APIs are only valid if sqlite_step() has returned SQLITE_ROW, which is not the case for empty tables.

So the question is, how can I discover column names for empty tables? Or, more generally, is there a better way to get this type of schema info in SQLite?

I feel like there must be another hidden sqlite_xxx table lurking somewhere containing this info, but so far have not been able to find it.

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Thanks to all. I mistakenly thought the PRAGMA interface was only for the sqlite3 command line client. –  Drew Hall May 30 '09 at 4:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 51 down vote accepted
sqlite> .header on
sqlite> .mode column
sqlite> create table ABC(A TEXT, B VARCHAR);
sqlite> pragma table_info(ABC);
cid         name        type        notnull     dflt_value  pk
----------  ----------  ----------  ----------  ----------  ----------
0           A           TEXT        0                       0
1           B           VARCHAR     0                       0
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2  
Looks like that works on the command line--how can I achieve the same effect programatically? –  Drew Hall May 30 '09 at 2:59
1  
@pragmanatu is your nickname a coincidence? :) –  Nick Dandoulakis May 30 '09 at 3:30
    
Thanks--this worked like a charm & is much simpler than what I was doing. Cheers! –  Drew Hall May 30 '09 at 4:05
1  
@Drew Hall This works also as a query executed programatically, not only from command line. –  SWilk Mar 8 '10 at 10:04

Execute the query:

PRAGMA table_info( your_table_name );

Documentation

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PRAGMA table_info( your_table_name ); doesn't work in HTML5 SQLite.

Here is a small HTML5 SQLite JavaScript Snippet which gets the column names from your_table_name even if its empty. Hope its helpful.

tx.executeSql('SELECT name, sql FROM sqlite_master WHERE type="table" AND name = "your_table_name";', [], function (tx, results) {
  var columnParts = results.rows.item(0).sql.replace(/^[^\(]+\(([^\)]+)\)/g, '$1').split(',');
  var columnNames = [];
  for(i in columnParts) {
    if(typeof columnParts[i] === 'string')
      columnNames.push(columnParts[i].split(" ")[0]);
  }
  console.log(columnNames);
  ///// Your code which uses the columnNames;
});
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It looks like if your table has more than one column, columns 2 - n don't get processed because of leading whitespace. This can be fixed by calling the trim() function on the string (or implementing it yourself for browsers that don't yet support trim()). Calling the above function on a table (Person) with an ID and Name field returns ["id", ""]. –  legacybass Oct 16 '12 at 22:40

The PRAGMA statement suggested by @pragmanatu works fine through any programmatic interface, too. Alternatively, the sql column of sqlite_master has the SQL statement CREATE TABLE &c &c that describes the table (but, you'd have to parse that, so I think PRAGMA table_info is more... pragmatic;-).

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SchemaCrawler is a free schema documentation tool, and supports SQLite.

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Execute this query

select * from (select "") left join my_table_to_test b on -1 = b.rowid;

You can try it at online sqlite engine

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I tried this, it didn't work. –  xApple Oct 31 '11 at 12:07
    
this way is the best! If you dont know the name of the rowid column I suggest using: SELECT t.* FROM (SELECT 1) LEFT JOIN table AS t LIMIT 1 –  conca Oct 25 '13 at 17:22

If you are suing SQLite 3.8.3 or later (supports the WITH clause), this recursive query should work for basic tables. On CTAS, YMMV.

WITH
    Recordify(tbl_name, Ordinal, Clause, Sql)
AS
    (
     SELECT
        tbl_name,
        0,

        '',
        Sql
     FROM
        (
         SELECT
            tbl_name,
            substr
            (
             Sql,
             instr(Sql, '(') + 1,
             length(Sql) - instr(Sql, '(') - 1
            ) || ',' Sql
         FROM
            sqlite_master
         WHERE
            type = 'table'
        )
     UNION ALL
     SELECT
        tbl_name,
        Ordinal + 1,
        trim(substr(Sql, 1, instr(Sql, ',') - 1)),
        substr(Sql, instr(Sql, ',') + 1)
     FROM
        Recordify
     WHERE
        Sql > ''
       AND  lower(trim(Sql)) NOT LIKE 'check%'
       AND  lower(trim(Sql)) NOT LIKE 'unique%'
       AND  lower(trim(Sql)) NOT LIKE 'primary%'
       AND  lower(trim(Sql)) NOT LIKE 'foreign%'
       AND  lower(trim(Sql)) NOT LIKE 'constraint%'
    ),
    -- Added to make querying a subset easier.
    Listing(tbl_name, Ordinal, Name, Constraints)
AS
    (
     SELECT
        tbl_name,
        Ordinal,
        substr(Clause, 1, instr(Clause, ' ') - 1),
        trim(substr(Clause, instr(Clause, ' ') + 1))
     FROM
        Recordify
     WHERE
        Ordinal > 0
    )
SELECT
    tbl_name,
    Ordinal,
    Name,
    Constraints
FROM
    Listing
ORDER BY
    tbl_name,
    lower(Name);
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