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I have a table that is to be sorted based on two columns of numbers (call them Column X and Column Y). In each row, the two columns can either both have numeric values (in which case X<=Y), or one of the columns can be NULL.

Example data:

      X     Y
    ----- -----
... NULL   26
...  31   NULL
...   1     7
...  39    46
... NULL   36
...  15    16
... NULL   14
...  23    29

I would like to sort this data so that the columns interleave "correctly". Specifically:

1) If the X value is present in both rows, order based on X.

2) Else, if the Y value is present in both rows, order based on Y.

3) Else, compare the available X value and the available Y value.

The "correct" sorting of the example data would be:

      X     Y
    ----- -----
...   1     7
... NULL   14
...  15    16
... NULL   26
...  23    29
...  31   NULL
... NULL   36
...  39    46

Is there any simple way to perform this sorting, in an ORDER BY clause?

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1  
Where would you place ... 25 NULL? –  Albin Sunnanbo Feb 15 '12 at 6:41
    
It would go between 23/29 and 31/NULL. Priority is always given to sorting by the X column if the populated in both rows. To clarify: The goal is to end up with the values in each of the two columns being sorted with respect to the other values in that column. For obvious reasons this is always possible on the X column, and it is usually possible to get "close" with the Y column--Consider 25/27; it would have to go after 23/29, even though this would cause a small mis-ordering in the Y column. –  VeeArr Feb 15 '12 at 6:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't. The order is not well defined

The simple set

5    10
7    null
null 8

can be sorted

null 8
5    10
7    null

and

5    10
7    null
null 8

depending on where you start sorting.

If possible I would change the sort criteria to "X if available, otherwise Y". Then you could use the COALSECE operator as suggested by "mu is too short". (order by coalesce(x, y))

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1  
Yeah, the final order depends on which rows get compared with which other rows so it isn't a property of the set as a whole, it is an artifact of the "sorting" process. Nice counter example. –  mu is too short Feb 15 '12 at 6:52
    
I was afraid that might be the case. Can you offer any suggestions for a reasonable way to make the sorting operation transitive? For example, as you've demonstrated, it is possible to pick more than one "correct" sorting for a particular data set; either is equally valid for my purposes (though the first is more in the spirit of what I'm trying to do). Is there a way to modify the "sorting rules" I laid out so that it gives the same output regardless of input ordering? –  VeeArr Feb 15 '12 at 6:52

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