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I have a C++ program that takes input from the terminal, and for some reason this is producing an endless loop:

double getSideLength()
{
    cout << "Enter a side: "
double side;
cin >> side; cin.ignore( 80, '\n' );
while (side <= 0){
    cout << "Please enter a valid side. Try again: ";
    cin >> side; cin.ignore(80, '\n');
}
return side;

This produces the output:

Enter a side: invalid
Please enter a valid side. Try again:
Please enter a valid side. Try again:
Please enter a valid side. Try again:
   .... and so on. "invalid" is the only input the user made
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1  
What do you use the ignore clause for? –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 15 '12 at 7:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

as said in operator>> documentation stream get its failbit on if "The input obtained could not be interpreted as an element of the appropriate type." That happens if you enter wrong number. So you just have to clear() cin before next input. Here is code:

double getSideLength()
{
        double side;
        cout << "Enter a side: ";
        cin >> side;
        if (!cin)
             cin.clear();
        cin.ignore( 80, '\n' );
        while (side <= 0){
                cout << "Please enter a valid side. Try again: ";
                cin >> side;
                if (!cin)
                    cin.clear();
                cin.ignore( 80, '\n' );
        }
        return side;
}
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This should fix the issues. Using !(cin >> side) will make sure that we get the correct type from cin.

double getSideLength()
{
    cout << "Enter a side: " << std::endl;
    double side = -1;
    while ( ! (cin >> side) and side <= 0)
    {
        cout << "Please enter a valid side. Try again: ";
        cin.clear();
        cin.ignore(1000, '\n');
    }

    return side;
}
share|improve this answer
double getSideLength()
{
    double side;
 getinput:
    cout << "Enter a side: "
    cin >> side; cin.ignore( 80, '\n' );
    if(side <= 0)
    {
        cout << "Please enter a valid side. Try again: "
        goto getinput;
    }
    return side;
}

try this one i hope this is helpful to you

share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't use goto clauses in your code. –  Pochi Feb 15 '12 at 7:30
    
im sorry why? im not a c++ guru and id like to know the reason why. thanks... –  Philip Badilla Feb 15 '12 at 7:32
1  
@Pochi: they might be awkward to read, follow and maintain, but there is nothing wrong with them (even MS examples have them), the compiler will take all loops down to computed jumps anyways. –  Necrolis Feb 15 '12 at 7:34
1  
goto is deemed bad style. The rationale behind it is that you could accomplish the same with a while loop and continues, which makes code readable. Nobody uses goto clauses in any type of presentable C++ code. @Necrolis: That defeats one of the reasons why you code in higher level languages -- abstraction. You might as well code in assembler. –  Pochi Feb 15 '12 at 7:35
1  
i just thought it is fine because it was a small function... but i think he is having a problem with this part of his code cin >> side; cin.ignore(80, '\n'); can't test though –  Philip Badilla Feb 15 '12 at 7:40

What do you want to happen when the user enters "invalid"? Decide, and then write some code to do that.

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It seems that there are a lot of intricacies with cin and in general, as is explained here, it might be preferable for you to use getline instead, and then use atoi.

Additionally, this issue of an infinite loop is also discussed here. If you would like to use cin, you can do so with the input into a string variable and then convert it into an integer using atoi as is displayed in this post.

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