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I've read a lot about Node.js being fast and able to accommodate large amounts of load. Does anyone have any real world evidence of this vs other frameworks, particularly .Net? Most of the articles i've read are anecdotal or don't have comparisons to .Net.

Thanks

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Could you be more precise in what kind of scenario we are talking? –  Marcus Granström Feb 15 '12 at 10:02
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I'm interested in any performance comparison of .Net and Node.js for comparable web applications running in IIS. –  David Merrilees Feb 15 '12 at 13:25
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I can't imagine anyone building a web site that had high perf. requirements out of .Net. The most basic problem you'd run into is that it's not going to be very cost effective in terms of licensing since high perf. sites usually require scaling out. And no I'm not a .Net hater. .Net pays the bills. –  Shane Courtrille Feb 15 '12 at 14:52
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I had to do internal tests of a small REST API using Node/express/mongo and the new .net webapi/mongo and there were perf differences based on what the client wanted, but at the end of the day, not enough to make a difference. You need to develop your own tests based on your own scenarios. It took us three days to write the different APIs in both languages and then another couple days to properly setup testing. If you are planning on doing anything remotely serious, I would suggest setting up tests based on your requirements and decide for yourself which is better for your load. –  AlexGad May 2 '12 at 18:48
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@ShaneCourtrille You're confusing .Net (a framework) and Windows (an operating system). They are very different things and there are NO licensing requirements for .Net (which runs quite nicely on Linux as Mono). –  rainabba Nov 1 '13 at 21:57

6 Answers 6

Being FAST and handling lots of LOAD are two different things. A server that's really FAST at serving one request per second might totally croak if you send it 500 requests per second (under LOAD).

You also have to consider static (and cached) vs dynamic pages. If you're worried about static pages, then IIS is probably going to beat node because IIS uses kernel-mode caching, which means requests that requests for a static page are not even going to get out of the kernel.

I'm guessing that you're looking for a comparison between ASP.NET and node. In this battle, after everything's been compiled/interpreted you're probably going to be pretty close in performance. Maybe .NET's a little FASTER or maybe node's a little FASTER, but it's probably close enough that you don't care. I'd bet on .NET, but I don't know for sure.

The place that node is really compelling is for handling LOAD. This is where the technologies really differ. ASP.NET dedicates a thread per request from it's thread pool, and once ASP.NET has exhausted available threads requests begin to queue. If you're serving "Hello World" apps like the example by @shankar, then this might not matter that much because the threads aren't going to block and you're going to be able to handle a lot of requests before you run out of threads. The problem with the ASP.NET model comes when you start making I/O requests that block the thread (call to a DB, make a http request to a service, read a file from disk). These blocking requests mean that your valuable thread from the thread pool is doing nothing. The more blocking you have, the less LOAD your ASP.NET app is going to be able to serve.

To prevent this blocking, you use I/O completion ports which don't require holding a thread while you wait for a response. ASP.NET supports this, but unfortunately many of the common frameworks/libraries in .NET DON'T. For example, ADO.NET supports I/O completion ports, but the Entity Framework doesn't use them. So you can build an ASP.NET app that's purely asynchronous and handles lots of load, but most people don't because it wasn't as easy as building one that's synchronous, and you might not be able to use some of your favorite parts of the framework (like linq to entities) if you do.

The problem is that ASP.NET (and the .NET Framework) were created to be un-opinionated about asynchronous I/O. .NET doesn't care if you write synchronous or asynchronous code, so it's up to the developer to make this decision. Part of this is because threading and programming with asynchronous operations was thought to be "hard", and .NET wanted to make everyone happy (noobs and experts). It got even harder because .NET ended up with 3-4 different patterns for doing async. .NET 4.5 is trying to go back and retrofit the .NET framework to have an opinionated model around async IO, but it may be a while until the frameworks you care about actually support it.

The designers of node on the other hand, made an opinionated choice that ALL I/O should be async. Because of this decision, node designers were also able to make the decision that each instance of node would be single threaded to minimize thread switching, and that one thread would just execute code that had been queued. That might be a new request, it might be the callback from a DB request, it might be the callback from a http rest request you made. Node tries to maximize CPU efficiency by eliminating thread context switches. Because node made this opinionated choice that ALL I/O is asynchronous, that also means that all it's frameworks/add-ons support this choice. It's easier to write apps that are 100% async in node (because node forces you to write apps that are async).

Again, I don't have any hard numbers to prove one way or another, but I think node would win the LOAD competition for the typical web app. A highly optimized (100% async) .NET app might give the equivalent node.js app a run for it's money, but if you took an average of all the .NET and all the node apps out there, on average node probably handles more LOAD.

Hope that helps.

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That's a really good explanation. Thank you –  Vytautas Butkus Aug 17 '12 at 13:04
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Remember that ASP.NET has supported async request handlers for a long time, and with MVC4 they have become extremely simple to use. –  fabspro Dec 25 '12 at 5:07
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"These blocking requests mean that your valuable thread from the thread pool is doing nothing. The more blocking you have, the less LOAD your ASP.NET app is going to be able to serve." Why does it matter whether we queue up front (the incoming request) or in the backend (the actual work thread)? No matter what, the client request is waiting for the response. I think the key that people overlook in this debate is "Throughput". Its not about how many concurrent connections a server hold, its how fast it can respond to each request right? –  sjdirect Mar 28 '13 at 23:30
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//Won't let me edit my comment, so here's what I meant to say.// @sjdirect - Throughput is not the same as response time. You're right to care about response time, but it's a choice between queue time + response time, or just response time. Processing of the request is going to take just as long in both scenarios (Executing synchronously is NOT going to make your DB request execute any faster), but if your request threads are blocked, then you're adding queue time to the requests as well because you can't even start processing the request until the previous requests are done. –  Matt Dotson May 1 '13 at 19:21
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+1 this is one of the best answers I've ever read. –  seanxe Jun 14 '13 at 23:10

I did a rudimentary performance test between nodejs and IIS. IIS is about 2.5 times faster than nodejs when dishing out "hello, world!". code below.

my hardware: Dell Latitude E6510, Core i5 (dual core), 8 GB RAM, Windows 7 Enterprise 64 bit OS

node server

runs at http://localhost:9090/
/// <reference path="node-vsdoc.js" />
var http = require("http");
http.createServer(function (request, response) {
response.writeHead(200, { "Content-Type": "text/html" });
response.write("<p>hello, world!</p>");
response.end();
}).listen(9090);

default.htm

hosted by iis at http://localhost/test/
<p>hello, world!</p>

my own benchmark program using task parallel library:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Net;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace HttpBench
{
class Program
{
    private int TotalCount = 100000;
    private int ConcurrentThreads = 1000;
    private int failedCount;
    private int totalBytes;
    private int totalTime;
    private int completedCount;
    private static object lockObj = new object();

    /// <summary>
    /// main entry point
    /// </summary>
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Program p = new Program();
        p.Run(args);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// actual execution
    /// </summary>
    private void Run(string[] args)
    {
        // check command line
        if (args.Length == 0)
        {
            this.PrintUsage();
            return;
        }
        if (args[0] == "/?" || args[0] == "/h")
        {
            this.PrintUsage();
            return;
        }

        // use parallel library, download data
        ParallelOptions options = new ParallelOptions();
        options.MaxDegreeOfParallelism = this.ConcurrentThreads;
        int start = Environment.TickCount;
        Parallel.For(0, this.TotalCount, options, i =>
            {
                this.DownloadUrl(i, args[0]);
            }
        );
        int end = Environment.TickCount;

        // print results
        this.Print("Total requests sent: {0}", true, this.TotalCount);
        this.Print("Concurrent threads: {0}", true, this.ConcurrentThreads);
        this.Print("Total completed requests: {0}", true, this.completedCount);
        this.Print("Failed requests: {0}", true, this.failedCount);
        this.Print("Sum total of thread times (seconds): {0}", true, this.totalTime / 1000);
        this.Print("Total time taken by this program (seconds): {0}", true, (end - start) / 1000);
        this.Print("Total bytes: {0}", true, this.totalBytes);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// download data from the given url
    /// </summary>
    private void DownloadUrl(int index, string url)
    {
        using (WebClient client = new WebClient())
        {
            try
            {
                int start = Environment.TickCount;
                byte[] data = client.DownloadData(url);
                int end = Environment.TickCount;
                lock (lockObj)
                {
                    this.totalTime = this.totalTime + (end - start);
                    if (data != null)
                    {
                        this.totalBytes = this.totalBytes + data.Length;
                    }
                }
            }
            catch
            {
                lock (lockObj) { this.failedCount++; }
            }
            lock (lockObj)
            {
                this.completedCount++;
                if (this.completedCount % 10000 == 0)
                {
                    this.Print("Completed {0} requests.", true, this.completedCount);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// print usage of this program
    /// </summary>
    private void PrintUsage()
    {
        this.Print("usage: httpbench [options] <url>");
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// print exception message to console
    /// </summary>
    private void PrintError(string msg, Exception ex = null, params object[] args)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
        sb.Append("Error: ");
        sb.AppendFormat(msg, args);
        if (ex != null)
        {
            sb.Append("Exception: ");
            sb.Append(ex.Message);
        }
        this.Print(sb.ToString());
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// print to console
    /// </summary>
    private void Print(string msg, bool isLine = true, params object[] args)
    {
        if (isLine)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(msg, args);
        }
        else
        {
            Console.Write(msg, args);
        }
    }

}
}

and results:

IIS: httpbench.exe http://localhost/test

Completed 10000 requests.
Completed 20000 requests.
Completed 30000 requests.
Completed 40000 requests.
Completed 50000 requests.
Completed 60000 requests.
Completed 70000 requests.
Completed 80000 requests.
Completed 90000 requests.
Completed 100000 requests.
Total requests sent: 100000
Concurrent threads: 1000
Total completed requests: 100000
Failed requests: 0
Sum total of thread times (seconds): 97
Total time taken by this program (seconds): 16
Total bytes: 2000000

nodejs: httpbench.exe http://localhost:9090/

Completed 10000 requests.
Completed 20000 requests.
Completed 30000 requests.
Completed 40000 requests.
Completed 50000 requests.
Completed 60000 requests.
Completed 70000 requests.
Completed 80000 requests.
Completed 90000 requests.
Completed 100000 requests.
Total requests sent: 100000
Concurrent threads: 1000
Total completed requests: 100000
Failed requests: 0
Sum total of thread times (seconds): 234
Total time taken by this program (seconds): 27
Total bytes: 2000000

conclusion: IIS is faster than nodejs by about 2.5 times (on Windows). This is a very rudimentary test, and by no means conclusive. But I believe this is a good starting point. Nodejs is probably faster on other web servers, on other platforms, but on Windows IIS is the winner. Developers looking to convert their ASP.NET MVC to nodejs should pause and think twice before proceeding.

Updated (5/17/2012) Tomcat (on windows) seems to beat IIS hands down, about 3 times faster than IIS in dishing out static html.

tomcat

index.html at http://localhost:8080/test/
<p>hello, world!</p>

tomcat results

httpbench.exe http://localhost:8080/test/
Completed 10000 requests.
Completed 20000 requests.
Completed 30000 requests.
Completed 40000 requests.
Completed 50000 requests.
Completed 60000 requests.
Completed 70000 requests.
Completed 80000 requests.
Completed 90000 requests.
Completed 100000 requests.
Total requests sent: 100000
Concurrent threads: 1000
Total completed requests: 100000
Failed requests: 0
Sum total of thread times (seconds): 31
Total time taken by this program (seconds): 5
Total bytes: 2000000

updated conclusion: i ran the benchmark program multiple times. Tomcat appears to be the fastest server in dishing out STATIC HTML, ON WINDOWS.

Updated (5/18/2012) Previously I had 100,000 total requests with 10,000 concurrent requests. I increased it to 1,000,000 total requess and 100,000 concurrent requests. IIS comes out as the screaming winner, with Nodejs fairing the worst. I have tabularized the results below:

NodeJS vs IIS vs Tomcat serving STATIC HTML on WINDOWS.

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23  
You are comparing apples with cats. Compare Node.js with ASP.NET MVC. At most IIS is faster at serving static files, though I seriously doubt even that. –  alessioalex May 17 '12 at 18:55
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@alessioalex : i dont understand why this comparison is not valid. i'm comparing the response times for static html. IIS is dishing out static html from default.htm, while nodejs server is dishing out the same string, and IIS comes out ahead. Comparing an ASP.NET MVC application would require more effort and time, and I'm planning to do it later. –  Shankar May 17 '12 at 19:56
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Ok, say that IIS is better at serving static files on Windows than Node. IIS only serves static files and such (like Apache or NGINX), Node does much more than that. You should be comparing ASP.NET MVC with Node (querying the database, retrieving data from an external service, etc etc). You'll see huge performance gains with Node over ASP.NET MVC. –  alessioalex May 18 '12 at 8:40
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@alessioalex in this example node isn't even parsing the request, meaning that IIS is doing way more and still 2.5x faster... –  fabspro Dec 25 '12 at 5:09
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If you are going to do this, please at least understand the nature of node. One Node process can only use a single core. So, what you are comparing is a node process running on one core to an IIS and tomcat process using multiple cores. In order to properly compare, you need to run node clustered. See nodejs.org/api/cluster.html for a simple to use cluster solution. However, I can tell you from experience, the difference between node and async c# is 10-15% either way depending upon what you're doing. –  AlexGad Feb 20 '13 at 13:49

I have to agree with Marcus Granstrom the scenario is very important here.

To be honest it sounds like you’re making a high impact architectural decision. My advice would be to isolate the areas of concern and do a "bake off" between whatever stacks you are considering.

At the end of the day you are responsible for the decision and I don’t think the excuse "Some guy on Stackoverflow showed me an article that said it would be fine" Will cut it with your boss.

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1  
I'm looking for something to convince people (including my boss) it's worth considering as an alternative to an MVC.net website, not to convince them we should swap. All I've found so far is anecdotal mentions that it can support more load and performs better. Has anyone actually proved this? –  David Merrilees Feb 17 '12 at 10:56
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But what is wrong with the MVC website? WHY are you trying to find an alternative? That is the most important Q. If the problem is it is dog slow under heavy concurrent load, then you should make sure you are using async.net. If it is still really slow, then you need to break down your code and figure out where your bottlenecks are. In my experience, there is not a massive different between node and async net in REAL WORLD scenarios. You can change your platform, but you will likely simply change one set of code bottlenecks/headaches for another set of code bottlenecks/headaches. –  AlexGad Feb 20 '13 at 13:56

NIO servers (nodejs etc) tend to be faster than BIO servers. (IIS etc). To back my claim,

Techempower is a company specialized on web framework benchmarks. They are very open and have a standard way of testing all framewrks. Checking out the http://www.techempower.com/benchmarks/

Round 9 tests is currently the latest. There are many IIS flavors tested, but aspnet-stripped seems to be the fastest IIS variant. Here are the results: Json Serialization: NodeJS: 228,887, aspnet-stripped: 105,272 Single Query: nodejs-mysql: 88,597, aspnet-stripped-raw: 47,066 Multiple Queries: nodejs-mysql: 8,878, aspnet-stripped-raw: 3,915 Plain Text: nodejs: 289,578, aspnet-stripped: 109,136

In all cases, NodeJS tends to be 2x+ faster than IIS.

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Main difference what I see is that node .js is dynamic programming language (type checking), so the types must be at run-time derived. The strongly typed languages like C# .NET has theoretically much more potential wins the fight against Node .js (and PHP etc.), especially where is expensive calculation. By the way the .NET should have better native interoperation with C/C++ than node .js.

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2  
Your suggestion that the "weak" typing in JS slows it down is wrong and irrelevant and regardless, that's comparing Apples and Stones (even Oranges would be more similiar than what you're suggesting). –  rainabba Nov 1 '13 at 22:07
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@rainabba When you compare computation of some kind (e.g. fibonacci of x) he is completely correct. –  Steve Dec 2 '13 at 19:44
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@steve Actually, given Z, you still cannot say that because JS is a language and .Net is a framework. They are completely different things. .Net runtimes are compiled for a particular processor architecture and so you can't change the performance of a particular chunk of code significantly for a single piece of hardware. As V8 has shows, JS can be interpreted and executed and extremely varying speeds and there's no reason to think that one day your fibonacci code written in JS won't run JUST as fast as with code run through the CLR (likely, it will be faster). Apples and Stones; as i said. –  rainabba Dec 3 '13 at 21:15

.Net is much faster than Node and Ruby

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4  
Great, thanks for settling that. Please show your evidence. –  David Merrilees Aug 11 at 11:06
    
They are 3 different things –  texasbruce Dec 6 at 2:50

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