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Consider the following code:

CLASS AuditProgressReport:

public class AuditProgressReport
{
    private List<AuditProgressReport> audit_progress_reports = null;

    private String name = null;
    private String description = null;

    private int compliant;
    private int non_compliant;
    private int not_completed ;

    /**
     * 
     */
    public AuditProgressReport()
    {
        super();
    }

    public AuditProgressReport(
        String name_param,
        int compliant_param,
        int non_compliant_param,
        int not_completed_param)
    {
        super();

        this.name = name_param;
        this.compliant = compliant_param;
        this.non_compliant = non_compliant_param;
        this.not_completed = not_completed_param;
    }

    public void addToCompliant(int compl_to_add_param)
    {
        this.compliant += compl_to_add_param;
    }

    public void addToNonCompliant(int non_compl_to_add_param)
    {
        this.non_compliant += non_compl_to_add_param;
    }

    public void addToNotCompleted(int not_compl_param)
    {
        this.not_completed += not_compl_param;
    }

    public void setAuditProgressReports(List<AuditProgressReport> report_category_nodes_param)
    {
        this.audit_progress_reports = report_category_nodes_param;
    }

    public List<AuditProgressReport> getAuditProgressReports()
    {
        return this.audit_progress_reports;
    }

    public void setCompliant(int compliantParam)
    {
        this.compliant = compliantParam;
    }

    public int getCompliant()
    {
        return this.compliant;
    }

    public void setNonCompliant(int nonCompliantParam)
    {
        this.non_compliant = nonCompliantParam;
    }

    public int getNonCompliant()
    {
        return this.non_compliant;
    }

    public void setNotCompleted(int notCompletedParam)
    {
        this.not_completed = notCompletedParam;
    }

    public int getNotCompleted()
    {
        return this.not_completed;
    }

    public void setName(String name_param)
    {
        this.name = name_param;
    }

    public String getName()
    {
        return this.name;
    }

    public void setDescription(String description_param)
    {
        this.description = description_param;
    }

    public String getDescription()
    {
        return this.description;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        return ("Compliant["+this.compliant+
            "] Non-Compliant["+this.non_compliant+
            "] Not-Completed["+this.not_completed+"]");
    }
}

And CLASS Tester:

public class Tester
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {

        List<AuditProgressReport> main_level = new ArrayList<AuditProgressReport>();

        AuditProgressReport ar_1_1 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_1",0,0,0);
        AuditProgressReport ar_1_2 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_2",0,0,0);

        AuditProgressReport ar_1_1_1 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_1_1",0,0,0);
        AuditProgressReport ar_1_1_2 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_1_2",15,65,20);
        AuditProgressReport ar_1_1_3 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_1_3",20,30,50);

        AuditProgressReport ar_1_1_1_1 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_1_1_1",5,5,90);
        AuditProgressReport ar_1_1_1_2 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_1_1_2",55,5,40);
        AuditProgressReport ar_1_1_1_3 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_1_1_3",35,35,30);

        List<AuditProgressReport> arl_1_1_1 = new ArrayList<AuditProgressReport>();
        arl_1_1_1.add(ar_1_1_1_1);
        arl_1_1_1.add(ar_1_1_1_2);
        arl_1_1_1.add(ar_1_1_1_3);

        ar_1_1_1.setAuditProgressReports(arl_1_1_1);

        List<AuditProgressReport> arl_1_1 = new ArrayList<AuditProgressReport>();
        arl_1_1.add(ar_1_1_1);
        arl_1_1.add(ar_1_1_2);
        arl_1_1.add(ar_1_1_3);

        AuditProgressReport ar_1_2_1 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_2_1",10,30,60);
        AuditProgressReport ar_1_2_2 = new AuditProgressReport("ar_1_2_2",20,20,60);



        List<AuditProgressReport> arl_1_2 = new ArrayList<AuditProgressReport>();
        arl_1_2.add(ar_1_2_1);
        arl_1_2.add(ar_1_2_2);

        ar_1_1.setAuditProgressReports(arl_1_1);

        ar_1_2.setAuditProgressReports(arl_1_2);

        main_level.add(ar_1_1);
        main_level.add(ar_1_2);


        Tester tester = new Tester();

        for(AuditProgressReport prog_rep : main_level)
        {
            tester.populateParents(prog_rep, null);
        }

        //TODO Now check the values...
    }

    private void populateParents(
        AuditProgressReport audit_progress_param,
        AuditProgressReport parent_param)
    {
        List<AuditProgressReport> audit_progress = 
            audit_progress_param.getAuditProgressReports();

        System.out.println("name["+audit_progress_param.getName()+"]");

        if(parent_param != null)
        {
            int compl = audit_progress_param.getCompliant();
            int nonCompl = audit_progress_param.getNonCompliant();
            int notCompleted = audit_progress_param.getNotCompleted();

            parent_param.addToCompliant(compl);
            parent_param.addToNonCompliant(nonCompl);
            parent_param.addToNotCompleted(notCompleted);
        }

        if(audit_progress != null && ! audit_progress.isEmpty())
        {
            for(AuditProgressReport prog_rep : audit_progress)
            {
                this.populateParents(prog_rep,audit_progress_param);
            }
        }
    }
}

When you run this, you will note that the values of the parent elements in the list is updated with the sum of the values in the child list.

The problem I am facing is that I want to have it updated all the way through the tree instead of just the immediate parent.

Is there a pattern that would help me achieve this?

See illustration below:

enter image description here

share|improve this question
2  
For each node, set its value to sum of its children's values. Smells like recursion ;) –  Andreas_D Feb 15 '12 at 9:07
    
Couldn't you make each parent listener of it's children? Would also save you some trouble manually updating. –  bdecaf Feb 25 '12 at 9:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

Like others suggested I would use the Observer pattern. Each parent node listens for changes on the childrens.

But my solution differs from that of @zmf because if you have a a big tree with lot of children node and at each update you have to sum each value, you would spend a lot of processing time.

What if you send only the difference between the old value and the new value each time you update a child node. Let's make an example. You start with this tree:

[12]--+--[10]-----[10]
      |
      +--[ 2]--+--[  ]
               |
               +--[ 2]

and you update a children like this

[12]--+--[10]-----[10]
      |
      +--[ 2]--+--[ 3]
               |
               +--[ 2]

the node that gets updated with the value "3" send its change to the parent with the method call parent.updateNode(3). The parent have only to sum its current value (in this example "2") with the value it receives from the child node. So it will update to the value "5"

[12]--+--[10]-----[10]
      |
      +--[ 5]--+--[ 3]
               |
               +--[ 2]

the node with the new value "5" will call parent.updateNode(3) and the final solution will be

[15]--+--[10]-----[10]
      |
      +--[ 5]--+--[ 3]
               |
               +--[ 2]

IMHO this solution is better because each updateNode() method have only to sum its own current value with the change received from its child node and call its parent with the same value received. You do not have to get the value from each one of your children and sum all the values. This will save you a lot of time if you have a big tree. So in this example when you change the value from 0 to 3. You will get 2 call to parent.updateNode(3) and each parent will get updated.

share|improve this answer
public void updateNode(int value) {

    if (value != this.value) {
        this.value = value;

        if (getParent() != null) {
            int sum = 0;
            for (Node n : getParent().getChildren()) {
                sum += n.getValue();
            }
            getParent.updateNode(sum);
         }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Other poster's suggested the use of the Observer pattern. The Observer pattern is a subset of a Pub/Sub pattern. I recommend using this over an Observer pattern.

The main difference between an Observer pattern and a Pub/Sub pattern is that in an Observer pattern, an Observer is both a publisher of ChangeEvents and a dispatcher of messages. It's essentially making every Observable into an EventDispatcher. In a traditional Pub/Sub pattern, Observables are only publisher's of ChangeEvents. ChangeEvents are published to a separate EventDispatchingService which handles what Subscribers the Events need to be sent to.

Attempting to track global changes with an Observer pattern is difficult to do. For example, if you want to count the number of times time the addToCompliant() method was called, you would have to add the Observer on every instance of the Observable. With an Event Pub/Sub, your observer class can just subscribe to listen on the type of ChangeEvent and it will receive all of them. The best (IMHO) Event Pub/Sub library I've used is Google Guava's Event Bus. In your particular case, I'd do something like the following.

public class EventBusSingleton {
    public static final EventBus INSTANCE = new EventBus("My Event Bus");
}

public class ComplianceChange {
    private AuditProgressReport changedReport;
    private int delta;

    public ComplianceChange(AuditProgressReport changedReport, int delta) {
        this.changedReport = changedReport;
        this.delta = delta;
    }

    ...
}

public class AuditProgressReport {

    ...
    private AuditProgressReport parent;

    public AuditProgressReport getParent() {
        return parent;
    }

    public void addToCompliant(int delta) {
        this.compliant += delta;
        ComplianceChange change = new ComplianceChange(this, delta);
        EventBusSingleton.INSTANCE.post(change);
    }
    ...
}

public class ComplianceChangeHandler {

    @Subscribe
    public void notifyParent(ComplianceChange event) {
        AuditProgressReport parent = event.getChangedReport().getParent();
        int delta = event.getDelta();
        parent.addToCompliant(delta);
    }

    @Subscribe
    public void somethingElse(ComplianceChange event) {
        // Do Something Else
    }
}

// Somewhere during initialization
EventBusSingleton.INSTANCE.register(new ComplianceChangeHandler());
share|improve this answer
    
I think the Pub/Sub pattern is not the best choice for this problem because the problem is too simple to use such pattern. In this problem only the direct parent node want to know the changes in the values of its children. I would use the Pub/Sub pattern for more complex problems, that is for asynchronous communication between two not correlated classes on two different package. Infact with this package the two parts of the communication can not know each other at compiletime or runtime. –  PinoSan Mar 1 '12 at 16:27

Based on your class name, I guess you want to see your audit progression live when running. So my hypothesis:

  • the tree structure does not change too much, almost fixed after creation
  • node values change often, counters initial states are 0

Here is an efficient implementation:

  • each node maintains the full list of its parent nodes
  • nodes are inserted with 0 value
  • when a node value is changed or simply increased, the parents' values from the node's list are updated by applying the delta between the previous node value

As a consequence the structure is always up-to-date, node insertion is still possible and does not impact the existing nodes.

If many audit threads run concurrently and report values into the structure, you have to take care to concurrency issues and use AtomicInteger as counter holders.

This is a pragmatic design and sincerely I have not found any matching pattern. Like for sort algorithms, trying to use patterns in such a context may be counter-productive.

share|improve this answer

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