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I don't get the following:

In the following String:

String s = "1234;x;;y;";

if I do:
String[] s2 = s.split(";");

I get s2.length to be 4 and

s2[0] = "1234";  
s2[1] = "x";  
s2[2] = "";  
s2[3] = "y"; 

But in the string: String s = "1234;x;y;;";

I get:

s2.length to be 3 and

s2[0] = "1234";  
s2[1] = "x";  
s2[2] = "y"; 

?

What is the difference and I don't get 4 in the latter case as well?

UPDATE:
Using -1 is not was I was expecting as behavior.
I mean the last semicolon is the end of the String so in the latter example I was also expecting 4 as length of the array

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1  
Well formulated question +1 –  user647772 Feb 15 '12 at 9:14
1  
Your question is exactly what is mentioned in the documentation (docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/…). Thus I do not think it is a proper question –  Adel Boutros Feb 15 '12 at 9:17
1  
@AdelBoutros: I think you are being harsh here, sure the behavior is documented in the javadocs, but considering the amount of poor questions that get asked in SO, I believe Jim has asked a pretty decent question, with a rather odd quirk of a method. His only miss is to not check the javadocs before asking here. –  posdef Feb 15 '12 at 9:27
    
Java’s split is mimicking Perl’s, which is why it works this way. –  tchrist Feb 15 '12 at 15:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

From the docs,

This method works as if by invoking the two-argument split method with the given expression and a limit argument of zero. Trailing empty strings are therefore not included in the resulting array.

UPDATE:

You have five substrings separated by ; In the second case, these are 1234, x, y, and . As per the docs, all empty substrings (at the end) which result from the split operation would be eliminated. For details, look here.

If n is zero then the pattern will be applied as many times as possible, the array can have any length, and trailing empty strings will be discarded.

The string boo:and:foo, for example, yields the following results with these parameters:

Regex   Limit   Result
  :       2     { "boo", "and:foo" }
  :       5     { "boo", "and", "foo" }
  :      -2     { "boo", "and", "foo" }
  o       5     { "b", "", ":and:f", "", "" }
  o      -2     { "b", "", ":and:f", "", "" }
  o       0     { "b", "", ":and:f" }   // all the empty substrings at the end were eliminated
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+1 thanks. Updated OP –  Jim Feb 15 '12 at 9:35
    
@ruakh Thanks. I didn't notice that! –  Pulkit Goyal Feb 15 '12 at 15:21

From http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/String.html#split(java.lang.String)

This method works as if by invoking the two-argument split method with the given expression and a limit argument of zero. Trailing empty strings are therefore not included in the resulting array.

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I see.But I can't then get the exact same result as the first string, right?I.e. length 4 since the last semicolon is actually the end of the string –  Jim Feb 15 '12 at 9:31

Trailing empty strings are omitted. If you need them use the approach described in http://www.xinotes.org/notes/note/226/

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Thanks!Updated OP –  Jim Feb 15 '12 at 9:35
    
Yes, right, you want to ommit the last trailing empty string. I don't think you can do that ad-hoc, but you can always split just the prefix of the string if you are always sure the last element is semicolon: s.substring(0, s.length() - 1).split(";", -1); –  Boris Strandjev Feb 15 '12 at 9:48

Good question. If you check the API documentation for String.split() and check the example with "boo:foo" then you can see that the trailing empty strings are omitted.

This method works as if by invoking the two-argument split method with the given expression and a limit argument of zero. Trailing empty strings are therefore not included in the resulting array.

The string "boo:and:foo", for example, yields the following results with these expressions:

Regex Result

: { "boo", "and", "foo" }

o { "b", "", ":and:f" }

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Why not check what does the documention says first. Here is the link:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/String.html#split%28java.lang.String%29

And here is your answer:

Trailing empty strings are therefore not included in the resulting array.

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Thats default behavior of split method in java to not return empty tokens . ]

s.split("\;", -1); should return empty token

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