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i have a problem . I'm trying to add and them retrieve objects of the same class to ArrayList , but when i try to retrieve them i get incompatible types erroe

import java.util.*;

public class Test{

Test(){
    main();
}

List test = new ArrayList();

public void main(){
    test.add(new Square(10));

    Iterator i = test.iterator();
    while(i.hasNext()){
        Square temp = i.next();
    }
}
}
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes - you're not using generics anywhere, so i.next(); is just returning Object as far as the compiler is concerned.

Options:

  • Use generics
  • Cast to Square:

    Square temp = (Square) i.next();
    

Personally I'd favour using generics - it's much nicer to have type safety where you can :)

// Not clear why this is an instance variable - and please make fields private :)
List<Square> test = new ArrayList<Square>();

public void main() {
    test.add(new Square(10));

    Iterator<Square> i = test.iterator();
    while(i.hasNext()) {
        Square temp = i.next();
        // Use square here
    }
}

Two asides:

  • The enhanced for loop can replace your while loop:

    for (Square square : test)
    
  • It's odd to have an instance method called main with no parameters; it's more common to have public static void main(String[] args). There's nothing illegal about what you've done here, just odd.

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@Downvoter: Care to comment? –  Jon Skeet Feb 15 '12 at 9:51
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You should use the generic type List<Square>, ArrayList<Square> and Iterator<Square> to avoid this.

If you don't the compiler cannot "know" what is the actual types of elements in test, and it "thinks" them as of type Object.

List<Square> test = new ArrayList<Square>();
public void main(){
    test.add(new Square(10));

    Iterator<Square> i = test.iterator();
    while(i.hasNext()){
        Square temp = i.next();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You have to cast to Square:

while(i.hasNext()){
    Square temp = (Square) i.next();
}

The iterator will return Object type elements only.

With Java 1.5+ and generics, we can do it without casting:

// a list, that will only accept Square instances
List<Square> test = new ArrayList<Square>();

public void main(){
    test.add(new Square(10));

    Iterator<Square> i = test.iterator();
    while(i.hasNext()){
        Square temp = i.next();
    }
}
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Dear downvoter, please explain... –  Andreas_D Feb 15 '12 at 9:49
    
I am not the downvoter, but I think that the downvoter might have only seen an earlier version of your answer - where you only mentioned the casting issue, and not the using generics alternative.. –  amit Feb 15 '12 at 9:51
    
eErr, no. That was not the case. And I consider the generics hint as a bonus info anyway - a simple cast perfectly solves the problem –  Andreas_D Feb 15 '12 at 9:53
    
@Andreas_D: My answer has been downvoted too. Unclear why. (Although I would say an answer which just had the cast would be somewhat unhelpful, as it would only be helping to solve the problem for the single line, instead of addressing the much broader point.) –  Jon Skeet Feb 15 '12 at 9:54
    
Though I agree with @JonSkeet: about the previous version, this version of the answer seems helpful to me. +1 for both answers from me –  amit Feb 15 '12 at 9:59
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