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Rails newbie here so please dont bang your head too much when you see what I'm having issues with (It should probably be straightforward!)

I'm working on an app whereby clients have services based on products (VPS) for sale. Whilst the number of actual products are minimal, they are highly configurable and pricing is dependant on a few factors:

  • Ram / HDD Size
  • The Location of the server (which may also change the currency)
  • Any product 'add-ons'.

I'm having an issue with how I'd actually go about implementing pricing this (generating a price from the various factors to add to a users service) - and after speaking to people they've given me different answers which has left me even more confused.

If it helps, I have my models like so:

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :services
  has_many :prices
  has_many :addons
  belongs_to :product_cat
end

class Service < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :product
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :location
end 

class Location < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_one :currency
  has_many :services
end

Any help would be appreciated. Cheers.

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1 Answer 1

First of all, I think you should take some time to think a bit more about your database structure. What type of relation do you have between Products and Services?

From what I understand, a product can have several services, and a service can be active for several products. This sound like a n->m association to me. If it's like that, you should have your tables set-up like this:

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :product_services
  has_many :services, through: :product_services
  has_many :prices
  has_many :addons
  belongs_to :product_cat
end

class ProductServices < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :product
  belongs_to :service
end

class Service < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :product_services
  has_many :products, through: :product_services
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :location
end 

class Location < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_one :currency
  has_many :services
end

With this setup, getting the price for a product should be pretty straightforward. If your product has a base price, and all of your services have a price, then the total price of the product is the sum of the base price and of all the individual services prices. Now that you have your associations in place, you can access them with the following:

product.services # returns all of the services for the specific product.
product.services.sum(:price) # returns the sum of all the individual prices of each service.

I hope this will help you in implementing your pricing solution. It can be a complex problem, but Rails provides a number of way to make it easier. As a side note, you should really have a look at the active_record documentation, it's full of information that will make your life easier.

Cheers!

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I might add that with this set-up, it is also easy to get the number of products using a specific service like this: service.products.count. It can be useful for example if you're thinking about deprecating a service, to make sure how many products are currently using it. –  Elhu Feb 15 '12 at 13:57
    
Hi Elhu, thanks for your input; though I'm not 100% that this helps me get any further... Basically services are based on the products, however each service is tied to one user (client) so that IP addresses and other specific service information can be tied to them. - With that in mind, does your answer still apply? –  Paul Millar Feb 16 '12 at 1:52

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