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I need to obtain the type which was supplied when instantiating a template. Consider the following example:

template <typename T> struct Foo
{
  typedef T TUnderlying;
};

static Foo<int> FooInt;

class Bar
{
public:
  auto Automatic() -> decltype(FooInt)::TUnderlying
  {
    return decltype(FooInt)::TUnderlying();
  }
};

int main()
{
  Bar bar;
  auto v = bar.Automatic();
    return 0;
}

Problem with this code is using the scope operator together with decltype. Visual C++ 2010 complains like this:

error C2039: 'TUnderlying' : is not a member of '`global namespace''

I gathered some information on the topic on Wikipedia:

While commenting on the formal Committee Draft for C++0x, the Japanese ISO member body noted that "a scope operator(::) cannot be applied to decltype, but it should be. It would be useful in the case to obtain member type(nested-type) from an instance as follows":[16]

vector<int> v;
decltype(v)::value_type i = 0; // int i = 0;

This, and similar issues were addressed by David Vandevoorde, and voted into the working paper in March 2010.

So I reckon the Visual C++ 2010 does not have this implemented. I came up with this workaround:

template <typename T> struct ScopeOperatorWorkaroundWrapper
{
  typedef typename T::TUnderlying TTypedeffedUnderlying;
};

auto Automatic() -> ScopeOperatorWorkaroundWrapper<decltype(FooInt)>::TTypedeffedUnderlying
{
  return ScopeOperatorWorkaroundWrapper<decltype(FooInt)>::TTypedeffedUnderlying();
}

Did I miss any solution which is more elegant and less verbose?

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1  
Have you tried FooInt::TUnderlying instead of decltype(FooInt)::TUnderlying? I don't see what you expect to gain via decltype here. –  sellibitze Feb 15 '12 at 10:19
    
All you add is ScopeOperatorWorkaroundWrapper<>, I don't know how much "less verbose" you could want it. After all, its a workaround. –  PlasmaHH Feb 15 '12 at 10:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This transparently replaces the decltype keyword with the template based workaround. Once you no longer need to support MSVC2010 you can remove the macro definition without changing any user code:

#if _MSC_VER == 1600
#include <utility>
#define decltype(...) \
  std::identity<decltype(__VA_ARGS__)>::type
#endif

Which allows this to compile and work on MSVC10:

std::vector<int> v;
decltype(v)::value_type i = 0;

Note that std::identity isn't part of the C++ standard, but it's safe to rely on it here as the workaround is limited to a compiler which includes std::identity in its standard library implementation.

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Use variadic macros to workaround the comma issue. #define decltype(...) detail::type_helper<decltype(__VA_ARGS__)>::type. Note that decltype(x) may not be the same as decltype((x)), so your t2 could result in a different type. –  kennytm Feb 15 '12 at 11:08
    
@KennyTM: Thanks, I've incorporated that into the answer. –  Joe Gauterin Feb 15 '12 at 11:14
    
I see this solution as the least intrusive and easiest to remove once the compiler implements this feature. Thank you for your time! –  Milan Stezka Feb 15 '12 at 11:25
    
Unfortunately, the version with VA__ARGS does not compile under MSVC (error C2065: 'VA__ARGS' : undeclared identifier), so I will have to stick with the #define decltype(exp) , but that is still fine by me. –  Milan Stezka Feb 15 '12 at 13:16
    
It compiles fine for me. Are you using it exactly as written? The leading and trailing underscores in __VA__ARGS__ are significant. –  Joe Gauterin Feb 15 '12 at 14:31

The workaround looks relatively fine but it’s not extensible and the names are horrible1. Why not use id?

template <typename T>
struct id {
    typedef T type;
};

And then:

id<decltype(FooInt)>::type::TUnderlying;

Untested, but should work.


1 As in, too verbose and even though they describe that it’s a workaround, this may be redundant and not a useful information in most of the situations.

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Thank you for your input. Regarding the names - it was just an example and I admit that the names could be a bit shorter, but I prefer names which capture the reasoning of the problem. Plain "id" would later (when I forget about it) tell me nothing that it was just a temporary hack. I think that it is not necessary with modern auto completion features at hand to make my code hard to understand with cryptic abbreviations. –  Milan Stezka Feb 15 '12 at 11:36
    
@Milan id is the correct name for this metafunction (it’s the identity function), and I think it’s actually already defined somewhere in C++11 precisely to serve as a syntactic workaround in places where a plain type cannot be used. Either way, you should use this name since it’s the established name for this concept and it’s generally understood. It’s by no means a “cryptic abbreviation” (which I agree should never be used). –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 15 '12 at 12:04
    
@Milan But since you mentioned auto completion: the reason to avoid long names is not that it takes long to type them (auto-completion helps here, true). But it also makes the code unreadable, and concise (brief, yet accurate) names should always be preferred. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 15 '12 at 12:05
    
VC++ 2010 comes with std::identity<> that does exactly this for exactly this purpose. –  ildjarn Feb 15 '12 at 18:12
    
@ildjarn Unfortunately I can’t find it in the C++11 standard draft. But then, the search in Preview sucks so it may be there. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 15 '12 at 20:03

As an alternative, you can easily pull the type out using a function template helper:

template <typename T> struct Foo
{
    typedef T TUnderlying;
};

static Foo<int> FooInt;

template <typename T>
typename Foo<T>::TUnderlying foo_underlying(Foo<T> const &)
{
    return typename Foo<T>::TUnderlying();
}

class Bar
{
public:
//    auto Automatic() -> decltype(FooInt)::Underlying
//    {
//        return decltype(FooInt)::Underlying;
//    }
    auto Automatic() -> decltype(foo_underlying(FooInt))
    {
        return foo_underlying(FooInt);
    }
};

int main()
{
    Bar bar;
    auto v = bar.Automatic();
}
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