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I wonder usage scenarios about try-finally blocks without catch blocks. Do you remember this kind of usage used most on what type of scenarios?

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7 Answers

up vote 34 down vote accepted

You would use it to ensure some actions occur after the try content or on an exception, but when you don't wish to consume that exception.

Just to be clear, this doesn't hide exceptions. The finally block is run before the exception is propagated up the call stack.

You would also inadvertently use it when you use the using keyword, because this compiles into a try-finally (not an exact conversion, but for argument's sake it is close enough).

try
{
    TrySomeCodeThatMightException();
}
finally
{
    CleanupEvenOnFailure();
}

Code running in finally is not guaranteed to run, however the case where it isn't guaranteed is fairly edge - I can't even remember it. All I remember is, if you are in that case, chances are very good that not running the finally isn't your biggest problem :-) so basically don't sweat it.

Update from Tobias: finally will not run if the process is killed.

Update from Paddy: Conditions when finally does not execute in a .net try..finally block

The most prevalent example you may see is disposing of a database connection or external resource even if the code fails:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection("")) // Ignore the fact we likely use ORM ;-)
{
    // Do stuff.
}

Compiles into something like:

SqlConnection conn;

try
{
    conn = new SqlConnection("");
    // Do stuff.
}
finally
{
    if (conn != null)
        conn.Dispose();
}
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+1 for the code example. –  Mitch Wheat Feb 15 '12 at 10:16
8  
@AnthonyBlake The exception isn't hidden. If an exception occurred, it would run the finally and then propagate the exception back up the call stack. –  Adam Houldsworth Feb 15 '12 at 10:22
2  
As for the edge case, the finally won't run if the process is killed (with "terminate process" in the task manager or because of a power outage, for example). –  Nuffin Feb 15 '12 at 10:42
1  
More information here about when a finally statement will not fire - not just when process is killed: stackoverflow.com/questions/111597/… –  Paddy Feb 15 '12 at 11:20
1  
Another obvious case where not all of the finally will run is if an error happens in the midst of the finally block. –  Ben Hocking Feb 15 '12 at 12:28
show 6 more comments

using is equivalent try-finally. You will only use try-finally when you want to do some clean up inside finally and don't care about the exception.

The best approach will be

try
{
   using(resource)
   {
       //Do something here
   }   
}catch(Exception)
{
     //Handle Error
}

Doing so even clean up called by using fails, your code will not fail.

There are some condition when finally will not get executed.

  • If there is any StackOverflowException or ExecutingEngineException.
  • Process is killed from external source.

Hope this answers your doubt.

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Have a look at the following link: http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/131397/why-use-try-finally-without-a-catch-clause

It depends on the architecture of your application and the operation you are performing in the block.

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If you have, for example an unmanaged resource you create and use in the try block, you can use the finally block to ensure you release that resource. The finally block will always be executed despite what happens (e.g. exceptions) in the try block.

E.g. the lock(x) statement is really:

System.Threading.Monitor.Enter(x); 
try { ... } 
finally 
{ 
    System.Threading.Monitor.Exit(x); 
} 

The finally block will always get called to ensure the exclusive lock is released.

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You need a finally block, when no matter which (if any) exceptions are caught or even if none are caught you still want to execute some code before the block exits. For instance, you might want to close an open file.

See Also try-finally

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try/finally: when you do not want to handle any exceptions but want to ensure some action(s) occur whether or not an exception is thrown by called code.

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I don't know anything about C#, but it seems that anything you could do with a try-finally, you could more elegantly do with a using statement. C++ doesn't even have a finally as a result of its RAII.

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