Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I was making a test case to show how 'bind' is necessary for a method to refer to its function in a callback.

But just when I thought I knew JS - the following code works fine - without requiring bind!

pretendThingConstructor = function (greeting) {
    this.greeting = greeting;
    this.sayHello = function() {
        console.log(this.greeting);
    };
}

var pretend_thing = new pretendThingConstructor('hello world');

pretend_thing.sayHello();

setTimeout(function() {  
    pretend_thing.sayHello()
}, 3000);

When I run it - via node, phantomjs, or another JS environment - it works. 'hello world' is printed twice.

I expected the second 'hello world' - the one ran after the timout - to fail, as 'this' would refer to the event, rather than the object. But it works. Why is this?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The this changes depending on how your call the function. If you specify a base object, it will refer to that instead:

pretend_thing.sayHello()

Here pretend_thing is that base object and therefore this still refers to that object. On the other hand, if you had:

var f = pretend_thing.sayHello;
f();

Here this should refer to window object instead.

You can confirm it by putting:

console.log (this instanceof pretendThingConstructor);

Inside your sayHello function. It will print true in both cases.


pretendThingConstructor = function (greeting) {
    this.greeting = greeting;
    this.sayHello = function() {
        console.log(this.greeting);
        console.log(this instanceof pretendThingConstructor);
    };
}

var pretend_thing = new pretendThingConstructor('hello world');
////////////////////////////

pretend_thing.sayHello();

setTimeout(function() {  
    pretend_thing.sayHello();
}, 3000);

will output:

true
true

whereas:

var f = pretend_thing.sayHello;
f();

outputs:

false
share|improve this answer
    
Short, simple and clear. Thanks @sarfraz! – mikemaccana Feb 15 '12 at 10:59
    
@nailer: You are welcome :) – Sarfraz Feb 15 '12 at 11:02

In the scope of the function 'pretendThingConstructor', 'this' refers to the function itself. When the constructor is run (when you instantiate an object using the 'new' keyword), the sayHello method (which is an anonymous method) will be assigned to the property 'sayHello' on the instantiated object (in your case, pretend_thing).

Because you're calling the 'sayHello' method FROM an instance of the 'pretendThingConstructor' object (pretend_thing), 'this' refers to the object that you're calling the method from, not the context that you're executing in.

You can change the meaning of the 'this' keyword by using the .apply method:

function myHello(){
    this.greeting = 'Hello';
    this.method = function(){
         this.greeting
    }
}

function myGoodbye(){
    this.greeting = 'Goodbye';
    this.say = function(){
         console.log( this.greeting );
    }
}

var hello = new myHello();
var goodbye = new myGoodbye();

hello.say(); // Outputs 'Hello'
goodbye.say(); // Outputs 'Goodbye'

hello.say.apply( goodbye ); // Outputs 'Goodbye'
share|improve this answer

Yes in this case the this object of sayHello is pretend_thing because the function knows on which item it is called. The this only gets lost if you're trying to do this:

<-- language: lang-js -->

var say = pretend_thing.say_hello;
setTimeout(function () {
    say(); // this is window or null
}, 15)

// You can do something like
function doThings() {
    console.log(this.thing);
}

var test1 = { doThings: doThings, thing: 1 };
var test2 = { doThings: doThings, thing: 2 };

test1.doThings(); // <- 1
test2.doThings(); // <- 2

So the context depends on where the function is attached. But you can override this behavior with the bind-thing.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.