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Furthering my experiments in proper Javascript, I'm trying to run one method (SayHello) from another (WaitAndSayHello). As a callback is involved, I have used bind to ensure that 'this' in each method refers to the object.

pretendThingConstructor = function (greeting) {
    this.greeting = greeting;

    this.SayHello = function() {
        console.log(this.greeting); // Works
    };

    this.WaitAndSayHello = function() {
        setTimeout(function() { 
            console.log(this)  
            this.SayHello() // Fails
        }, 500);
    }
    this.WaitAndSayHello.bind(this); // This bind() doesn't seem to work
}


var pretend_thing = new pretendThingConstructor('hello world');
pretend_thing.SayHello();
pretend_thing.WaitAndSayHello();

The code prints 'hello world', then fails with 'Object # has no method 'SayHello'' the second time around. I can see, from the console.log, that 'this' is referring to the event. However shouldn't have using bind() fixed this?

How can I make the bind() work?

Additionally, I'd like to do this cleanly: ie, without referring to the name of the object in multiple places.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't "late call" .bind(). You need to invoke it at function declaration time, like

this.WaitAndSayHello = function() {
    setTimeout(function() { 
        console.log(this)  
        this.SayHello() // Fails
    }, 500);
}.bind(this)

Furthermore, the anonymous function you pass into setTimeout() creates a new context and therefore, has its own this context value.

You either need to hold a reference to the "outer this" in a variable like

this.WaitAndSayHello = function() {
    var self = this;

    setTimeout(function() { 
        console.log(self)  
        self.SayHello() // succeeds
    }, 500);
}.bind(this)

or use .bind() again, like

this.WaitAndSayHello = function() {
    setTimeout(function() { 
        console.log(this)  
        this.SayHello() // succeeds
    }.bind(this), 500);
}.bind(this)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @jAndy, that explains things perfectly. I've always found something about 'var self = this' a bit hacky, so I've using the second solution - I suspect it will become part of my day-to-day JS programming, so thanks again. –  mikemaccana Feb 15 '12 at 11:32
1  
@nailer: very welcome. Remember, .bind() is part of ES5 so it might not natively available in old'ish browser. But its very easy to shim and there are lots of shims available out there. –  jAndy Feb 15 '12 at 11:34
    
PS. @jAndy I think we can get away with only one bind - on the function called from setTimeout. binding WaitAndSayHello is unnecessary. You may wish to update your answer for the next guy. –  mikemaccana Feb 15 '12 at 14:20

you should use:

this.WaitAndSayHello.call(this);

or

this.WaitAndSayHello.apply(this);

the difference between apply and call is the way you would pass arguments to the called function: imagine WaitAndSayHello received some args:

this.WaitAndSayHello = function(toWho, helloMessage){
 ...
}

with call, you would pass the arguments after the context, as you were invoking the function normally:

this.WaitAndSayHello.call(this, 'Bob', 'Hello');

with apply, you would have to pass the args as an array:

this.WaitAndSayHello.apply(this, ['Bob', 'Hello']);

Edit

Sorry, i read your code wrong, @jAndy's anwser is really the right one, however, to use my logic you could do something like:

this.WaitAndSayHello = function() {
        setTimeout.call(this, function() { 
            console.log(this)  
            this.SayHello() // Fails
        }, 500);
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
How would this change the this referencing to DOM window within the setTimeout callback? –  Niklas Feb 15 '12 at 11:28
    
you are right, i read the code wrong. I will try to fix it –  André Alçada Padez Feb 15 '12 at 11:29

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